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34th ANNUAL NEWS & DOCUMENTARY EMMY® AWARDS

THE NOMINATIONS

 

OUTSTANDING COVERAGE OF A BREAKING NEWS STORY IN A REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

ABC News Special Events, World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline          
Tragedy at the Elementary School
ABC
From the start, despite mayhem and confusion, ABC News’ coverage of the shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School was strong, serious, thoughtful and heartfelt. The division produced many hours of indelible reporting, extensive special reports and a riveting interview with a teacher who saved the lives of her students.

BBC World News America   
Egypt: Second Round of Revolution
BBC World News

When Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak was removed from power in February 2011, tens of thousands packed into Tahrir Square to celebrate. But less than two years later they were back in Tahrir as President Mohamed Morsi issued a decree giving his government sweeping new powers. It’s a move that was met with great anger, and the BBC was there as the people once again raised their voices in protest. Through a series of reports, the BBC’s team on the ground covered the demonstrations, spoke to protestors about their grievances and tried to analyze the government’s moves.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
Attack on Benghazi
CBS

As the fog of confusion and disinformation in Washington grew dense following the death of Ambassador Christopher Stevens, CBS flew two correspondents to Benghazi, Libya to try and make sense of the conflicting stories. With the help of a forensic expert they were able to piece together the full nature of the attack by examining the evidence on the US compound's roof.  By meticulously following the tangled links between rival Islamic militias, CBS was first to correctly report that there had been no anti-US demonstration on the Embassy before the attack. CBS also broke the fact that the US mission had a large CIA component which was probably a factor in the attack. The CBS teams tracked down witnesses to the attack, and collected exclusive cell phone video to retrace Stevens' movements and reconstructed the terrifying ordeal of his last hours alive.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
House Arrest, A Daring Escape From China
CBS
When blind, outspoken Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng made a daring escape from house arrest in his rural village, his story attracted international media attention. But Chen told CBS correspondent Holly Williams that he was extremely concerned about the retaliation his brother's family and his elderly mother might face. Williams’ team flew to Shandong Province and became the first Western reporter to get through the security cordon surrounding Chen's village. Williams recreated Chen’s daring escape route, and also found Chen's mother in her traditional courtyard house. In a dramatic, tearful interview, Chen's mother spoke about her fears for her son, and how she was forcibly searched and harassed every time she stepped outside. 

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
The Fight For Idlib
CBS

In February 2012, correspondent Clarissa Ward and producer Ben Plesser became the first American journalists to report live from inside Syria with the armed opposition. The pair spent a week living with members of  Idlib's Martyr's Brigade. They interviewed dozens of fighters and residents about their fears as the war came closer. They joined the rebels on their training sessions, and they were there when the body of a tortured activist was found on the side of the road, a warning to the opposition forces. Ward and Plesser also went along when the Martyr's Brigade tried to re-take a critical checkpoint from government soldiers -- an operation that killed four fighters -- including one who was part of the family they were staying with.

 

OUTSTANDING CONTINUING COVERAGE OF A NEWS STORY IN A REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

BBC World News America   
Inside Syria’s Uprising
BBC World News

Throughout 2012, BBC World News America aired a series of reports from inside Syria which gave a vivid account of the country slipping into civil war. Correspondent Paul Wood was inside Homs, where the daily bombardment left residents with nowhere to hide. Ian Pannell spent nearly two weeks with rebel forces in the province of Idlib. His reporting included a detailed look at how the opposition was waging their fight against the Assad regime and followed them as they planted an IED which was strapped to the back of a motorbike. Further reports included Paul inside Aleppo as it came under assault. Then, in October, Ian Pannell was in Aleppo to report on a hospital which had come under sustained attack. The doctors working there struggled against incredible odds, and one father lost his son during Ian’s visit.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
Inside Syria
CBS
In December 2012, as the rebel fighters won decisive victories on the outskirts of the capital, Syria's military started shelling civilian neighborhoods it could no longer control. Correspondent Elizabeth Palmer and producer Agnes Reau were repeatedly denied permission to travel to the suburbs to report on the story. Instead, the pair faked a stomach flu and linked up secretly with 21-year old opposition activist Sara. Together, they took a public bus to her home in the suburbs of Moadimiyah, controlled by the Free Syrian Army, gaining rare and unfettered access to the resistance network fighting to hold on to the shattered suburb. During the night, they lived - and filmed - the nightmare of families forced to flee into their own basements to escape the barrage of constant shelling. The result was an extraordinary two part series that showed the war from the point of view of ordinary families and activists, going through the motions of a daily routine in the face of growing government attacks.

CNN’s Coverage of the War in Syria
CNN
As the unrest in Syria has spiraled out of control, CNN has been there to analyze, add context and most important to bear witness. CNN journalists have taken grave risks to tell the unfolding story of the war.  Venturing into Syria both with and without official visas, CNN put names and faces on some of the thousands of dead, maimed and arrested— and those in danger of becoming so.

NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams       
Inside Syria
NBC
As the conflict in Syria escalated in 2012, with the death toll rising to an estimated 60,000, correspondent Richard Engel, spent months in the country on multiple reporting assignments. Throughout the year, Engel chronicled the growing effectiveness of the rebel movement in its campaign to drive President Assad from power – effective in that the rebels were eventually able to assert control over key cities such as Homs and Aleppo. At the same time, the rebel gains were met by an increasingly aggressive response by the Assad regime. In mid-December, Engel and his NBC colleagues were taken hostage by an unknown group and told they would be used to secure the release of hostages held by Syrian rebels. Although they were not harmed physically, Engel recalled that “they made us choose which one of us would be shot first, and when we refused there were mock shootings.” After five days they were freed when their captors were stopped at a checkpoint.

NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams       
Washed Ashore
NBC
Over the past year, NBC News extensively documented and reported on the wave of tsunami debris arriving on U.S. shores. NBC News’ reporting began in Sitka, Alaska shortly after debris with Japanese markings washed ashore. Working in conjunction with top scientists and researchers from around the world, NBC continued their coverage with reports on the areas most impacted by the debris landings and the residual, potential long-term impact on wildlife and the environment. Much of the reporting was reviewed and passed along to scientists in both the U.S and Japan in an effort to keep the international scientific community up to date on possible invasive species washing ashore. NBC’s coverage brought a heightened sense of awareness to the potential environmental and ecological complications caused by tsunami debris.

 

OUTSTANDING FEATURE STORY IN A REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

ABC News Nightline  
Arctic Journey: The Unicorn of the Sea
ABC

Nightline journeyed to Baffin Island in the Canadian High Arctic to track one of the world’s most elusive creatures, the Narwhal.  The arctic sea ice is melting faster this year than any other on record, making the Narwhal the most vulnerable species in the arctic to climate change. The story became even more real when the Nightline team saw the ice literally disappear beneath their feet.

ABC News Nightline  
Inside the New Ku Klux Klan
ABC

This eye opening report shed light on a frightening cross-section of American culture, where racism, rather than being on the wane, is in fact alive and thriving in ways long thought relegated to the past. Nightline investigated the hatred being spread by an angry and highly motivated group of people operating far from the public eye.

CBS This Morning     
Chuck Close: A Note to Self
CBS

Chuck Close is a portrait painter who suffers from face blindness, as well as learning disabilities, and is confined to a wheelchair as a quadriplegic. In April of last year, he wrote about how all of these characteristics have affected his life in a beautiful letter of advice to his nine-year-old self.

CBS This Morning     
Tagging Great Whites
CBS

Plenty of people are fascinated by sharks, great whites in particular. But for all the interest, precious little is understood. Scientists have stunning knowledge gaps when it comes to the "giants of the ocean." Where do they live? Where do they breed? How far do they travel? CBS set out to explore some of these issues as they accompanied OCEARCH, a team of scientists and fishermen, on an historic expedition off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  OCEARCH, in conjunction with the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Division, set out to "spot tag" a white shark – something that had never been done in the waters of the North Atlantic.

CBS This Morning
Wynton Marsalis: An Essay for Martin Luther King, Jr.
CBS
Martin Luther King once said, “Long before the modern essayists and scholars wrote of racial identity as a problem for a multiracial world, musicians were returning to their roots to affirm that which was stirring within their souls.” It was in that vein that esteemed jazz musician and CBS News Cultural Correspondent Wynton Marsalis was asked to evaluate his relationship with King on the occasion of his holiday. As Marsalis recalled his past relationship to the great leader, a mix of images and video of Marsalis and King illuminate the screen, all perfectly timed to bring the viewer closer to the story. Through the technology of CBS News’ state-of-the-art virtual studio, the piece went from a poignant essay to a near three-dimensional recreation of King’s legacy.

Sunday Morning       
Glen Campbell
CBS

Alzheimer’s disease is usually a private agony, as family members watch a loved one fade away.  But Glen Campbell and his family decided to take his Alzheimer’s diagnosis public.  He has been traveling the country for one last, unprecedented tour before he is unable to perform. In this portrait, correspondent Anthony Mason shows us first-hand what happens when Alzheimer’s strikes an American icon: The memories that remain of the good (and bad) old days, the impact on his family and the love that’s keeping Glen Campbell in the spotlight.

Sunday Morning       
Starting Over
CBS

For Dakota Meyer, the Medal of Honor was a heavy cross to bear. He was lionized for his heroism in a 2009 battle fought in a remote Afghan valley, yet all he felt was failure at not being able to rescue four fellow Marines caught in an ambush. What to everyone else was courage under fire was for Meyer the worst day of his life.  As he related in an interview with correspondent David Martin, Meyer fell so deeply into depression and drink he tried to take his own life – he actually pulled the trigger on a gun he thought was loaded.  Only after that deafening click did he come to realize the Medal of Honor was bigger than he was. It could not ease his sense of failure but it could enable him to use his unwanted fame to raise money for the children of Marines killed in combat.

Sunday Morning       
Walking on Air
CBS

Any moderately breezy summer’s day, Theo Jansen is likely to be racing barefoot along the sandy beaches north of Rotterdam, chasing and tweaking the walking wind-powered sculptures he calls “Strandbeests”.  That’s Dutch for “Beach Animals”, and Theo is their creator and guardian.  Now 65, Jansen studied physics at college but left without a degree, determined to make his living as an artist.  In his forties, he wrote a tongue-in-cheek newspaper column suggesting that coastal flooding might be alleviated by self-propelled robotic creatures that would roam Holland’s beaches, piling sand onto the dunes.  He promised to devote a year to developing the idea – and he’s been at it ever since.  Correspondent Elizabeth Palmer and the CBS Sunday Morning crew travelled to Holland to meet Jansen in the shipping container that doubles as his workshop, where he explained how and why he has re-invented and refined the Beests over the years. 

 

OUTSTANDING INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM IN A REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

ABC World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline
Brian Ross Investigates: TSA Theft
ABC

In the first nationwide investigation into a burgeoning problem of theft within the Transportation Security Administration, the ABC News Investigative team compiled compelling data, an insider’s tell-all, victim stories and its own tracking integrity test at TSA checkpoints. The story resulted in immediate impact and calls for swift change.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
Ivory Poaching
CBS

The slaughter of African elephants reached epic proportions in 2012 as poaching gangs became increasingly sophisticated using military-style weapons -- including Ak47s and attack helicopters -- to shoot the animals and hack off their tusks. More than 25,000 elephants were killed last year as part of the multi-million dollar global trade in illegal ivory. Fuelling the demand are wealthy Chinese customers who prize ivory as a status symbol.  In a two-part series, CBS News focused on both the killing fields in Africa, and on the sophisticated trafficking network that funnels the Ivory to the East.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
Medevac
CBS

On the battlefield there is nothing more urgent than getting rescue helicopters to a soldier who has been hit by enemy fire; it is a race against time which begins the moment the soldier is wounded. This story  captures all of the drama and heartbreak of one Medevac rescue in Afghanistan – from the instant an Improvised Explosive Device hit an American patrol through the agonizing wait for the helicopter, with all its lifesaving capabilities, to arrive.  In this case, the Medevac was only five minutes flying time away, but regulations requiring it to have an armed escort delayed its flight. As precious minutes turned into a wait of more than an hour, the soldier died. This story is more than a sequence of events, however. It explores the more basic issue of whether the U.S. should arm its Medevac helicopters so that they do not have to wait for a gunship to escort them. 

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley; CBS This Morning Saturday
Libya Dying for Security
CBS

CBS News was first to interview the key witness in the denied security requests leading up to the attack on the US Mission at Benghazi: the Commander of a Special Forces Unit, Lt. Col. Andrew Wood.  In a series of exclusive reports, Col. Wood told his compelling story: how those on the ground, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens, documented a drastically deteriorating security situation in Libya and made repeated requests for continued or enhanced security only to have them all denied. His team and other security experts were pulled out of Libya just weeks ahead of the Benghazi attack despite their push to remain. Col. Wood’s story became the baseline for subsequent questions asked by members of Congress and their investigative staff, and he later testified under oath.

CBS This Morning; CBS Sunday Morning    
Exposing the Business of Congress
CBS

From taking hidden cameras to a posh Republican Freshman fundraiser, to an exclusive look inside Washington lobbying, CBS News Investigative Correspondent Sharyl Attkisson exposed Congressional shenanigans in a series of exclusive reports. In “Key Largo Freshmen”, undercover cameras captured the first Campaign 2012 fundraiser for a group of Freshmen Republicans at an exclusive seaside resort. Those collecting money included Tea Party Republicans who had criticized Washington’s ways, but seemed to eagerly embrace them behind closed doors.  In the exclusive report “Hidden Mortgage Tax”, CBS exposed a Congressional sleight-of-hand finagled to extend the payroll tax cut: a hidden, giant fee on home buyers for the next ten years. And a six month investigation into Washington lobbying resulted in unprecedented access to the little-known world inside K Street. Compelling firsthand interviews show how lobbyists do much more than just influence legislation—they actually write it.

 

OUTSTANDING BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC REPORTING IN A REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

ABC News Nightline  
Brian Ross Investigates: Phantom Debt Collectors
ABC

Harassing debt collection calls are now a top consumer complaint. A massive international scam has taken it to the next level by collecting money from vulnerable people who actually don't owe a penny.  An ABC News investigation dove into the scam and tracked down the man to whom FTC officials say all roads lead. For the first time, the most prolific scam to hit Americans in years finally had a face. 

ABC World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline
Brian Ross Investigates: Tragedy in Bangladesh
ABC

The investigative team documented the trail of accountability from the dangerous garment factories in Bangladesh to U.S. stores where top US retailers sell their clothing. The multi-part ABC News investigation has been credited with creating real change for the workers who toil hidden in factories far from the eyes of American consumers.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
Cancer Drug Shortages
CBS

In December, 2011, eight-month-old Elena Schoenveld was diagnosed with leukemia. Her treatment depended on a drug called methotrexate. But on pharmacy shelves at the hospital treating her—and around the country—the drug was running out.  The scarcity of methotrexate was part of a national drug shortage that had tripled between 2005 and 2010, reaching crisis proportions by 2011, when 186 drugs were in short supply, including 28 cancer drugs used to treat more than half a million people. The reasons for the shortage were complicated but included manufacturing problems and low profit margins for the drugs, which had become mostly generic, and therefore less remunerative than brand-name versions.

CBS This Morning; CBS Evening News Saturday; CBS Evening News Sunday                  
Green Energy Going Red
CBS

In this series of original investigative reports CBS News investigative correspondent Sharyl Attkisson documents the fate of $90 billion dollars in green energy stimulus tax spending, in an attempt to find out why it did not produce the promised results: a boom in green energy technology and products accompanied by a burst in employment.

 

OUTSTANDING COVERAGE OF A BREAKING NEWS STORY IN A NEWS MAGAZINE

Dateline NBC 
Tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary
NBC

Immediately after reports of a shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary surfaced, NBC News dispatched a large team of correspondents, producers and cameramen to Newtown, Connecticut to piece together the facts behind a shooting that left the entire country grieving and looking for answers.  In a matter of hours, NBC News presented a report that gave viewers a full and personal picture of tragedy, the pastoral town in which it took place, and a glimpse of what the future held for Newtown and the nation. 

48 Hours CBS News Prime Time Special    
Newtown
CBS
When, in the early afternoon on December 14, officials in Newtown, Connecticut announced that 26 innocent people were dead inside the Sandy Hook Elementary School, there was an audible gasp in many newsrooms that would be echoed all across the country. By the numbers it was the second worst school shooting in America’s history, but it was hard to imagine anything worse given the tender age of most of the victims. CBS News immediately scrambled to produce a prime-time broadcast anchored by Correspondent Scott Pelley. The broadcast struck a balance between the information developed by CBS correspondents and producers in the field, and the details that could only be provided by the survivors, especially the children. Their accounts, which sometimes seemed improbable, would prove disturbingly accurate.

60 Minutes    
Tragedy In Newtown
CBS

Scott Pelley reports on the Connecticut elementary school massacre and talks to the school's nurse who survived it despite seeing the shooter. He also interviews former U.S. Secret Service members who have studied assassins and school shooters, who try to explain the mindset of the alleged 20-yr.-old gunman, Adam Lanza.

FRONTLINE
The Battle for Syria
PBS

The late summer 2012 was a critical moment in the battle for control over Aleppo, Syria. Violence spiked as fighting raged on in the streets of Syria’s largest city. It was during this time that FRONTLINE journeyed into the heart of the insurgency, spending days on the ground with the rebel forces in Aleppo who were waging a full-scale assault on President Bashar al-Assad’s army.

 

OUTSTANDING CONTINUING COVERAGE OF A NEWS STORY IN A NEWS MAGAZINE

60 Minutes
Aleppo
CBS

The Syrian Civil War is taking lives and wrecking cities like Aleppo, the country's largest. Clarissa Ward gets inside the country to report on its civilian victims, the rebels who the West is refusing to support and Islamic militants who some fear will hijack the revolution.

60 Minutes    
Three Generations of Punishment
CBS

Born in a prison camp in North Korea, defector Shin Dong Hyuk describes how three generations of a family are brutally punished if one family member is considered disloyal to the regime. He tells Anderson Cooper the dramatic story of his escape.

FRONTLINE  
Al Qaeda in Yemen
PBS

Foreign correspondent Ghaith Abdul-Ahad traveled across the deeply divided country of Yemen, introducing viewers to a string of dusty, desolate towns operating under the black flag of Al Qaeda. There, with the threat of American drone strikes looming, militants affiliated with Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula plot attacks on the U.S. and work to construct an Islamic state, governed by Sharia law.

FRONTLINE  
The Regime Responds
PBS

In Syria, there is no Arab Spring. With daily reports of the rising death toll in Syria, and the near constant shelling of civilians by forces loyal to the regime of Bashar Al Assad, The Regime Responds is a somber account of the Syrian uprising nearly two years on. The report recalls the historical and contemporary forces that have contributed to the making of the current moment, and is informed by the crescendo of daily reports enumerating wartime casualties--the kind of carnage and destruction of nightmare proportions that Syrians bravely face on a daily basis, but which is unfathomable to us as outsiders.
Executive Producer:  David Fanning

 

OUTSTANDING FEATURE STORY IN A NEWS MAGAZINE

60 Minutes    
Face Blindness
CBS

Lesley Stahl reports on a little known condition that prevents people from recognizing faces, even those of family members. Some studies estimate that as many as one in 50 people are afflicted with face blindness.

60 Minutes    
Joy in the Congo
CBS

The Congo's Kimbanguist Symphony Orchestra grew from one man's dream to 200 musicians and vocalists providing joy to the mostly poor, bleak capital of Kinshasa. It's now the only symphony orchestra in Central Africa and the only all-black one in the world.

60 Minutes    
The Baby Lab
CBS

60 Minutes discovered a husband and wife team of psychologists at Yale University who are exploring the deepest of philosophical issues in research subjects who can’t walk, talk, or in many cases, even sit up on their own: babies.  The team -- Karen Wynn and Paul Bloom -- have developed a series of carefully controlled studies designed to probe what’s really going on inside the minds of infants as young as 3 months old.  

Dateline NBC 
Josie's Story
NBC

It's unclear how many children around the world have felt trapped in their own bodies the way 11-year-old Josie Romero has struggled with hers. Born a boy but living socially as a girl since age 6, Josie started to feel intense, emotional anguish by age 9. Like so many transgender children who see entering puberty as a traumatic experience, Josie didn't want her growing male body (with its growth spurts, bodily hair, deepening voice, an Adam’s apple, etc.) to betray who she was. At the same time, she wanted the one physical feature that would prove, once and for all, that she was "just like all the other girls." With the time clock of nature running against them, Josie and her mother, Venessia, embarked on a controversial medical journey that continues to ignite debate – in families, society and the medical community.

FRONTLINE  
Middle School Moment
PBS

High school dropout rates are at epidemic levels and the consequences of an incomplete education are little short of an economic death sentence. If dropping out is an epidemic, the disease develops very slowly – a gradual, years-long process of disengagement from school. Robert Balfanz of Johns Hopkins University has spent years hunting for what he calls “early warning indicators.” Using Balfanz’s research, FRONTLINE followed at-risk student Omarina Cabrera to test the proposition that middle school constitutes a determining period for a child's educational fate.

 

OUTSTANDING INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM IN A NEWS MAGAZINE

Dan Rather Reports  
Adopted or Abducted?
AXS TV

From the 1950’s though the 70’s, as many as 1.5 million children who were thought to be adopted were in fact technically abducted soon after birth. In a sweeping six-month investigation that spanned from Australia to the United States, Dan Rather Reports unveiled a practice that was quietly condoned at the time, so-called “forced adoptions.”

60 Minutes    
Stem Cell Fraud
CBS

Stem cells still have not proven to be the panacea many claimed they could be, yet the Internet is alive with stem cells for sale to treat incurable illnesses. Scott Pelley reports on one man offering to treat cerebral palsy who a respected stem cell researcher says could be endangering patients.

FRONTLINE  
Opium Brides
PBS

Afghanistan produces most of the world’s opium, fueling the global heroin trade, funding terrorist groups like the Taliban and bringing billions of dollars a year into the country’s economy. But the illegal harvest and government eradication efforts are also creating hidden victims: young Afghan girls who are kidnapped or traded to smugglers to meet the debts of impoverished opium farmers.

Need to Know         
Crossing the Line at the Border
PBS

“Crossing the Line at the Border” examines the death of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas, an undocumented immigrant who had a fatal heart attack shortly after being subdued by agents, beaten, and shot with a Taser gun at the San Ysidro border crossing on May 28th, 2010.  PBS also looked more broadly into a culture of abuse that has been allowed to fester within the Border Patrol.  The team traveled to Nogales, Mexico to speak with individuals who were detained by the Border patrol and were denied sufficient food, water, medical attention, and were allegedly physically assaulted by border agents.

Aquí y Ahora 
Fast and Furious (Rápido y Furioso)
Univision

“Aqui y Ahora” (“Here and Now”) reported on “Fast and Furious” and the drug trade’s violent impact in Mexico.  For the first time, Univision revealed the true human cost of the ATF’s failed program.  U.S. border patrol agent Brian Terry was shot and killed by Mexican criminals in 2010 with a weapon that had been obtained through the ATF’s botched “Fast and Furious” gun tracking program. That story made headlines.  But dozens of murders in Mexico, carried out with guns that had been lost through the very same program, went unreported -- until Univision investigators were able to expose that “Fast and Furious” guns were discovered at some of Mexico’s most violent crime scenes.

 

OUTSTANDING BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC REPORTING IN A NEWS MAGAZINE

60 Minutes
A Hard Landing
CBS

Seven thousand employees of the Kennedy Space Center lost their jobs when the final Space Shuttle was launched last July, a loss of income that's hit the local economy hard.

60 Minutes
The Case Against Lehman Brothers
CBS

Steve Kroft talks to the bank examiner whose investigation reveals the how and why of the spectacular financial collapse of Lehman Brothers, the bankruptcy that triggered the world financial crisis.

Rock Center with Brian Williams     
The Target
NBC

Correspondent Harry Smith investigated the targeting of Charlie Engle by the Department of Justice for mortgage fraud.  Engle spent a year and a half in prison for using stated-income, or “liar” loans - a common practice during the housing boom that ultimately led to the 2008 financial crisis. However, while Engle served hard time for a comparatively minor offense, the vast majority of the Wall Street brokers and bankers who engaged in disastrous lending practices received billions of dollars in government bailouts.

FRONTLINE
Cell Tower Deaths
PBS

The job of building and maintaining communication towers had been labeled the nation’s most dangerous job by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the government’s worker safety regulator.  Yet surprisingly, if you wanted to find out how many workers were killed building out AT&T’s cell network, or Verizon’s, or any other cell carrier, there was no information to be found. That’s because the cell carriers subcontracted out their tower work to small contractors, thus shrouding their role in fatal accidents.

FRONTLINE  
Six Billion Dollar Bet
PBS

Jon Corzine, former head of Goldman Sachs and political power broker, took over MF Global in the spring of 2010 with oversize ambition and a passion for risk. But after a massive bet on European debt turned sour, the firm lay in ruins, with more than a billion dollars of customer funds missing. In The Six Billion Dollar Bet, FRONTLINE investigates how Corzine's traders went around MF Global's risk officers and how he swayed regulators in Washington to allow risky practices to continue.

 

OUTSTANDING NEWS DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

This Week with George Stephanopoulos   
Tragedy at the Elementary School
ABC
This Week’s special edition of the program live from Newtown, Connecticut was a thoughtful, tough, yet touching look at the tragic event through the eyes of a community in mourning and a nation outraged by the seemingly unimaginable shooting.

AC360
Kids on Race: The Hidden Picture
CNN
Race is one of the most explosive issues in America, and for many adults the most taboo to talk about. But simply not talking about it does not solve any of the issues and that is what this project aimed to do – get kids and their parents to talk about race and to look to this youngest generation to see how far we’ve really come.  CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360° teamed up with renowned child psychologist Dr. Melanie Killen to scientifically understand how race influences a child’s world.

Morning Joe  
Newtown Tragedy
MSNBC

When Joe Scarborough served as a Republican congressman from the conservative region of northwest Florida, the NRA gave him a top rating for his unrelenting interpretation of gun rights. However, in this powerfully written message delivered shortly after the mass shooting at Newtown, Connecticut Joe shared how the tragedy pushed him to immediately evolve his reading of the First and Second Amendments. The monologue was a raw, defiant stake in the ground that profoundly resonated with viewers and decision-makers alike, and continues to have a strong impact on the gun control debate.

NOW with Alex Wagner      
Women In Politics
MSNBC

NOW decided to dedicate an entire show to women and the American political landscape. The program focused the discussion on several key issues: the underrepresentation of women in both chambers of Congress, the wage gap that still exists between women and men in the work place, the fight over reproductive rights and equality and violence against women.

The Rachel Maddow Show  
Special Report: Now with 100% Less Armageddon
MSNBC

On March 19, 2012, Rachel Maddow began her show with an 18-minute history lesson in nuclear armament. At a time when an entire decade of news reporting has been driven by terrorism, efforts to secure nuclear material and prevent the building of a nuclear explosive device have never been more vital. Ms. Maddow and her team travelled with officials from the National Nuclear Security Administration to a nuclear facility in Toluca, Mexico as they went to pick up highly-enriched uranium that would be transported to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. One month later, The Rachel Maddow Show was able to air its exclusive report that in the entire nation of Mexico there was no longer any highly-enriched uranium, and to show viewers exactly how that had come about. Viewers not only got to travel along as Ms. Maddow and her production team went to Mexico. They were first given the history and context they would need to understand why the story was so important.

Need to Know         
The Massachusetts Mandate
PBS

Coverage of health care typically focuses almost exclusively on the poisonous political debate surrounding the issue. Precious little time is spent on the far more important question: does the centerpiece of the program, the individual health mandate, actually work? To try to answer that question, “Need to Know” sent its medical correspondent, Dr. Emily Senay, to Massachusetts.  Its health care plan, adopted under then-Gov. Mitt Romney, has been in effect for six years and is the model for the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed in 2010.

 

OUTSTANDING LIVE COVERAGE OF A CURRENT NEWS STORY—LONG-FORM

ABC NEWS SPECIAL EVENTS         
Tragedy at the Elementary School
ABC

Diane Sawyer and her team deployed to Connecticut where Sawyer interviewed a first grade teacher who gave viewers an intimate and harrowing account of the shooting.  Brian Ross reported with up to the minute information on the shooter, Adam Lanza, who was armed to the teeth with legally purchased guns.  ABC News dedicated the weeks ahead to the Search for Solutions. All platforms would explore complex issues including mental illness, school safety, and guns, and try to answer the questions so many in America were asking.

Good Morning America       
Superstorm Sandy: The Aftermath
ABC

From the moment Superstorm Sandy touched down, Good Morning America was on the scene all across the East Coast, bringing viewers the latest on a storm that destroyed homes and coastlines, crippled transportation systems, upset the financial market, and in the worst cases took precious lives. 

CBS News
Supreme Court Health Care Ruling
CBS
On June 28, 2012, the country held its breath as it prepared to learn the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature overhaul of the nation’s health care system.   The centerpiece was the Individual Mandate, the requirement that most Americans obtain health insurance or pay a penalty with their income tax. The decision, when it was finally handed down, was complex, and it took time to break down, understand, and explain the ruling in live coverage of this breaking news. The CBS News team, led by Scott Pelley, was determined to take whatever time was necessary to present an accurate, clear, and understandable breakdown of the decision.

Election Night in America
CNN   
Seven CNN control rooms in three separate cities with hundreds of staffers worked together to tell the story of the election in a blockbuster broadcast symphony. In addition to getting the votes first, CNN also got the analysis right, with John King at the "magic wall" to put reporting expertise on display with a visual tool that put each precinct's fight in geographic and political perspective. 
         
Israel/Gaza Conflict
CNN
As tensions rose in the conflict between Israel and Hamas, CNN sent additional reporters and anchors to the region to buttress its already considerable staff in the Middle East.  CNN’s live updates and its reporters’ deep experience in the region allowed viewers to follow the conflict and hear from the political leaders involved, and who were influencing the talks that eventually led to a ceasefire.

 

OUTSTANDING CONTINUING COVERAGE OF A NEWS STORY—LONG FORM

HBO Documentary Films     
The Tsunami and The Cherry Blossom
HBO

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom came from a desire to tell the story of the Japanese people and the tragedy of March 11th 2011 in a uniquely cinematic way. Each story in the film is structured around the arc of grieving, and contains a narrative progression – from shock and devastation to acceptance and hope as blossom season arrives, undeterred by the destructive forces of the tsunami. The people featured suffer a loss in Winter – but as Spring arrives, they dig deep and find a way to move forward: Winter gives way to Spring, destruction to renewal. The resulting film is a visual haiku which meditates on the fragility of life, but also on the wonderful inevitability of rebirth and regeneration.

FRONTLINE  
Climate of Doubt
PBS

In an election season when not one question about climate change was asked during the three national Presidential debates, FRONTLINE took on this politically charged subject, setting out to discover what was behind this dramatic reversal.  As the mainstream scientific consensus only increased, climate change became one of the most polarizing issues on the political landscape, and concerted action ground to a halt in congress and across the nation.  How did this happen? FRONTLINE went inside the groups who shifted the direction of the climate change debate, and explored how the skeptics mobilized, built their arguments, and undermined public acceptance of an overwhelming global scientific consensus.

FRONTLINE  
Inside Japan's Nuclear Meltdown
PBS
In the desperate hours and days after the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the fate of thousands of Japanese citizens fell into the hands of a small corps of engineers, firemen and soldiers who risked their lives to prevent the Daiichi nuclear complex from complete meltdown.  A year after the disaster, FRONTLINE presented their story, with rare footage from inside the plant and exclusive eyewitness testimony. 

FRONTLINE  
Poor Kids
PBS
In Poor Kids, FRONTLINE traveled to the Quad Cities, a great American crossroads along the border of Iowa and Illinois, to explore the lives of children living in the suburbs of the nation’s heartland and growing up poor.  Poor Kids closely follows three families from summer to fall to winter—chronicling their daily struggles with food insecurity, transportation, housing and mounting expenses, as the seasons turn colder.

 

OUTSTANDING INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM—LONG-FORM

FRONTLINE  
Big Sky, Big Money
PBS
FRONTLINE’s investigation into the impact of campaign finance laws on US elections took them to Montana, where a bitter bid for a US Senate seat was attracting unprecedented spending by outside groups attempting to influence the race.  At the same time, the state was fighting a challenge to its own campaign finance laws brought by another outside group – a challenge that carried all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court with national implications.

FRONTLINE  
Dollars and Dentists
PBS
More than 100 million Americans don’t go to the dentist because they can’t afford it. Instead, they end up broke, in severe pain and struggling to get by. Sometimes they even die.  Dollars and Dentists, a joint investigation by FRONTLINE and the Center for Public Integrity, examines the nation’s ruptured dental-care system, and some solutions to fix it.

Independent Lens    
As Goes Janesville
PBS
As Goes Janesville catapults viewers to the front lines of America's debate over the future of its middle class – a debate that has become a pitched battle over unions in the normally tranquil state of Wisconsin. Spend three years in the lives of laid-off workers trying to reinvent themselves; business leaders aligned with the governor to promote a pro-business agenda that they believe will woo new companies to town; and a state senator caught in the middle, trying to bring peace to his warring state and protect workers' rights. As Goes Janesville, so goes America, a polarized nation losing its grasp on the American Dream.

POV   
Give Up Tomorrow
PBS

July 16, 1997 was a typical day for Paco Larrañaga. He attended culinary classes and then enjoyed the nightlife in Manila with his classmates. The next morning he was back at school for a day of exams. Three hundred miles away on the island of Cebu, parents Dionisio and Thelma Chiong were filing missing-persons reports. Their daughters Marijoy, 21, and Jacqueline, 23, had disappeared while waiting for their father. The sisters would never be seen alive again.  Two months later, Paco's sister, Mimi, received a call from her frightened brother saying he was being arrested for the rape and murder of both Chiong sisters. Six other boys in Cebu were also arrested. Give Up Tomorrow is the story of Paco and his harrowing journey through the Filipino justice system.

POV
Granito: How to Nail a Dictator
PBS

Filmmakers Pamela Yates, Paco de Onís and Peter Kinoy present a haunting tale, part political thriller, part memoir, of the extermination of nearly 200,000 Guatemalan people, told through the lens of lawyers and activists who have never given up on the quest for justice and strive to hold the murderers accountable.

 

OUTSTANDING INFORMATIONAL PROGRAMMING—LONG-FORM

MSNBC Documentaries       
Semper Fi: Always Faithful
MSNBC

Marine Corps Master Sgt. Jerry Ensminger was a devoted marine for nearly 25 years. He lived and breathed the Marine Corps, but when his nine-year-old daughter Janey died of a rare type of leukemia, his world collapsed. As a grief-stricken father, he struggled for years to make sense of what happened. His search for answers led to the shocking discovery of one of the largest water contamination sites in US history—at Camp LeJeune where he had once been based. With relentless determination, he spearheaded a decades-long battle to make this information public. Semper Fi is a story of one man’s transformation into the activist he never imagined he would become.

FRONTLINE
The Interrupters
PBS

Shot over the course of a year, The Interrupters captures the streets of Chicago during a period of widespread violence that drew nationwide attention, most notably the brutal beating of Derrion Albert, a Chicago High School student whose death was caught on videotape. Chicago during that time became a national symbol of the violence in our cities.  Following the day-to-day battles of a group of Violence Interrupters, all of whom have criminal backgrounds themselves, a raw and powerful story emerges on the root causes of the violence in our cities and possible solutions.   

FRONTLINE  
The Suicide Plan
PBS
You have an incurable illness, you want to die, and you want help dying. What can you do? People who are terminally ill and live in Oregon or Washington can openly ask a doctor for help. But in the rest of country, where physician assisted suicide is illegal, people who are suffering turn in secret to friends, family, members, and activist organizations. The Suicide Plan explores the underground world of assisted suicide, where the lines between legality and criminality are blurred as never before.

POV   
My Reincarnation
PBS

Filmed over the course of twenty years, My Reincarnation follows Tibetan Spiritual Master and Scholar Chögyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche as he rises to prominence as a Buddhist teacher in the West, while his Italian-born son, Yeshi, recognized at birth as the reincarnation of a famous spiritual master, breaks away from his father’s tradition to embrace the modern world in which he was raised. With unprecedented access to the family’s private life, filmmaker Jennifer Fox follows a long, gentle, sometimes amusing, yet intense struggle between Namkhai Norbu and his son, Yeshi.

Wish Me Away                  
Showtime
Wish Me Away is a personal and intimate look at Chely Wright, the first country music star to come out as gay. After a lifetime of hiding, she shatters cultural and religious stereotypes within Nashville, her conservative heartland family, and most importantly, herself. It shows both the devastation of internalized homophobia, and the transformational power of living an authentic life.

 

OUTSTANDING HISTORICAL PROGRAMMING—LONG-FORM

HBO Documentary Films     
The Loving Story
HBO
A racially-charged criminal trial and a heart-rending love story converge in this documentary about Mildred and Richard Loving, a part-black, part-Indian woman married to a white man in Jim Crow era Virginia. Thrown into rat-infested jails and exiled from their hometown for 25 years, the Lovings fought back and changed history. They were paired with two young and ambitious lawyers who were driven to pave the way for social justice and equal rights through a historic Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia. THE LOVING STORY takes us on a journey into the heart of race relations in America. But, in the end, it is a poignant story of two people who simply wanted to chose who they could love and marry and live in the place they called home.

HBO Documentary Films     
Vito
HBO
Vito Russo was one of the most outspoken and inspiring activists in the LGBT community’s fight for equal rights. He was a pivotal part of three well-known organizations during their formative years - GAA (Gay Activists Alliance), GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation), and ACT UP (AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power).  His seminal book “The Celluloid Closet” explored the ways in which gays and lesbians were portrayed on film, and how those negative images were at the root of society’s homophobia. He continued writing, lecturing, speaking out and acting up until just months before his death in 1990.

American Experience
Jesse Owens
PBS

He was the most famous athlete of his time, whose stunning triumph at the 1936 Olympic Games of four gold medals captivated the world, even as it infuriated the Nazis. Despite the racial slurs he endured, his grace and athleticism rallied crowds around the world. Yet when Jesse Owens returned home, he came back to a segregated America where he couldn’t even ride in the front of a bus. His story is also about the elusive, fleeting quality of fame and the way Americans idolize athletes when they suit our purpose, and forget them once they don’t.

Independent Lens    
We Were Here
PBS

When AIDS came to San Francisco in the early 1980s, the city became a war zone. Friends and family members were struck down in their prime by a mostly mysterious illness for which there was no cure. But the community — hippies, drag queens, lesbians, moms and dads, doctors and nurses — came together when the nation's leaders looked the other way and built an unprecedented system of love, care, and compassion. Their tireless fight is a testament to the capacity of people working together to rise to an unthinkable occasion.

POV
Nostalgia for the Light
PBS

Director Patricio Guzmán traveled to the Atacama Desert to talk to the astronomers who gaze into starlight for cosmic truth; the archeologists who dig to bring the truth of human history into the light; and the haunted relatives of the disappeared who still sift the parched ground for traces of a more recent history — the victims of Pinochet's dictatorship.

 

OUTSTANDING BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC REPORTING—LONG FORM

CNBC Original
The Costco Craze: Inside the Warehouse Giant
CNBC

“The Costco Craze” isn’t just a profile of the world’s most successful discount warehouse chain.  It’s a vivid, detailed snapshot of how capitalism actually works.  This remarkably successful store has thrived by adopting a counter-intuitive retail model:  it never advertises, its stores are bare-bones warehouses with concrete floors and goods stacked on pallets, it offers a limited and eclectic array of products, from cat food to caskets to high-end French wine, and its customers have to pay a fee just to shop there.  It’s a business model that shouldn’t work, except that it does, and in enormous numbers:  600 stores, 66 million members, and $93 billion in annual sales.

Fareed Zakaria GPS  
Global Lessons: The GPS Road Map for Saving Health Care
CNN

America’s health care costs just keep on climbing. No other country in the world spends more than 12 percent of its economy on health care; the United States spends 17 percent. And yet its healthy life expectancy ranks 30th in the world – behind Slovenia.  Why, and what can be done about it?  CNN’s Fareed Zakaria traveled the world to see what works and what doesn’t. From Britain’s government-run National Health Service, to Taiwan’s low-cost system, to Switzerland’s completely private model: there’s no one path to the ideal system. But would a combination of each work?

HBO Documentary Films     
Hard Times: Lost on Long Island
HBO

The Great Recession "officially" ended in the summer of 2010, but for 25 million unemployed and underemployed Americans the fallout continues.  For too many, their middle-class life has been foreclosed and their dreams have turned into nightmares.  Sadly, their stories have been ignored.   In a strange way they have been “disappeared,” evicted from our collective conscience – a permanent new underclass of long-term unemployed.  Located on Long Island, birthplace of the post-war suburban American Dream, this documentary chronicles the lives of four families in this new underclass. 

FRONTLINE  
Money, Power and Wall Street
PBS

Since 2008, Wall Street and Washington have fought against the tide of the fiercest financial crisis since the Great Depression. In Money, Power and Wall Street, FRONTLINE presents the inside story of the crisis told by its main players.  A comprehensive investigation of the financial crisis from its origins to the present day, the series reveals the struggle to rescue and repair a shattered economy, explores key decisions, missed opportunities, and the unprecedented and uneasy partnership between government leaders and titans of finance that affects the fortunes of millions of people around the world.

 

OUTSTANDING INTERVIEW

Moyers & Company 
Interview: Karl Marlantes
American Public Television

In this intimate one-on-one conversation, Bill Moyers talks to Karl Marlantes — a highly-decorated veteran and author of Matterhorn, one of the seminal literary works on the Vietnam War — about the deep spiritual and emotional cost of war on those who fight it.  Through personal stories and experienced analysis, Marlantes exposes the widening chasm between the vast majority of civilians insulated from the daily rigors of war and the tiny percentage of men and women who fight on our behalf. He insists that every citizen share the heavy burden of war, and not just the soldiers actually on the front lines of combat.

60 Minutes    
Killing Bin Laden
CBS

A first-hand account of the raid that killed the world's most wanted terrorist from one of the Navy SEALs who pulled the trigger. Scott Pelley interviews "Mark Owen," a former SEAL who was in the room when Osama bin Laden died from American bullets, in his only interview. "Owen," a pseudonym he uses for security, recalls each step of the mission and the preparation he and the nation's elite force made for it, in order to give credit to his SEAL comrades and the hundreds of others whose work played a role in the successful mission.

60 Minutes    
Spielberg
CBS

Hollywood's most successful filmmaker, famous for action and special effects, goes a new way with an historic film on Abraham Lincoln's quest to abolish slavery. Lesley Stahl profiles Steven Spielberg.

Andrea Mitchell Reports      
Ambassador Nancy Brinker's First Interview
MSNBC

When Susan G. Komen for the Cure announced on January 31, 2012 that it was cutting off funds for breast-cancer screenings from Planned Parenthood, the decision generated outrage among women across the country. For breast cancer survivors and ardent supporters of the Komen Foundation, the news was an especially bitter pill to swallow.  Two days after the organization’s shocking announcement, Andrea Mitchell Reports secured an exclusive interview with Komen’s founder and CEO, Nancy Brinker, who started the foundation in 1982 after her sister died of breast cancer.

Rock Center with Brian Williams     
One-On-One
NBC

In an exclusive interview with unprecedented access,  NBC News’ Brian Williams joined President Obama on Air Force One as the President was about to embark on an eight-state campaign blitz.  The President discussed his relationship with Gov. Mitt Romney, his lackluster performance in the election’s first presidential debate and his administration’s handling of the crisis in Libya.  Obama defended his campaign’s release of a 20-page document detailing his plan for the next four years. The document was released the day after the final presidential debate and left pundits questioning whether its release was a late move made by a campaign that believes its opponent might be gaining momentum.

 

OUTSTANDING ARTS AND CULTURE PROGRAMMING

HBO Documentary Films
God Is the Bigger Elvis
HBO

God is The Bigger Elvis sought to answer two questions about the main character, Mother Prioress Dolores Hart:  Why would an A-list Hollywood actress, enjoying the peak of her career, suddenly quit and enter an abbey?  What has her daily life and spiritual dedication been for 49 years?

HBO Documentary Films     
Marina Abramović: The Artist is Present
HBO

Seductive, fearless, and outrageous, Marina Abramović has been redefining what art is for nearly forty years. Using her own body as a vehicle, pushing herself beyond her physical and mental limits, and at times risking her life in the process, she creates performances that challenge, shock, and move us. Through her and with her, boundaries are crossed, consciousness expanded––and art as we know it is reborn. At once a glamorous art-world idol, a lightning rod for controversy, and a myth of her own making, Marina is also, quite simply, one of the most compelling artists of our time.

HBO Documentary Films     
Raising Renee
HBO

Raising Renee tells the story of acclaimed artist Beverly McIver and her casually delivered promise to her mother Ethel that she would take her sister Renee, who is mentally handicapped, when Ethel dies.  Raising Renee takes us from the time when Ethel and Renee shared a home in Greensboro, NC through Ethel’s illness and death, then to the pivotal moment in 2004 when Beverly brought Renee to live with her in Arizona and North Carolina.  Viewers experience the consequences of Beverly’s promise to “raise” her sister, a forty-three-year-old woman/child, at a time when she had hoped to focus on her burgeoning career and on finding a life partner.

Independent Lens    
Circo
PBS

The Ponce family's hardscrabble circus has lived and performed on the back roads of Mexico since the 19th century.  But can their way of life survive into the 21st century? Circo intimately portrays the Ponce family circus as it struggles to make a living off its artistry, sweat, and wit against the backdrop of Mexico's collapsing rural economy.

Freud's Naked Truths          
Smithsonian Channel
Artist Lucian Freud, grandson of Sigmund, spent much of his career in relative obscurity. In the last quarter of his life, however, his audaciously explicit portraits would intrigue the art world and break records at auction. This behind-the-scenes look at Freud features rare footage of him in his studio, where he painted supermodels, gangsters, and British nobility. Witness a portrait of the artist, revealed by the lovers, friends, children -- and even critics -- who were caught up in the strands of his life and captured with his brush.

 

OUTSTANDING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMMING

HBO Documentary Films     
Project NIM
HBO

PROJECT NIM follows an individual chimpanzee through infancy and adolescence to adulthood, showing both his emerging behavior and its impact on the humans who lived around him.  There are many intriguing behavioral overlaps between humans and chimpanzees explored in the film, but it’s the differences between the species that really shape Nim’s life with humans and determine his unhappy fate. The paradox and heartbreak for the humans around Nim is that he can scratch and bite people whom he seems genuinely to like. The heartbreak for Nim is that he cannot be any other way and, as he gets stronger, this will guarantee his virtual imprisonment. As the research veterinarian, James Mahoney, later observes in the film: “once you put them in a cage, it’s all downhill from then on…”

HBO Documentary Films     
Saving Face
HBO

SAVING FACE follows the journey of reconstructive surgeon Dr. Mohammad Jawad as he travels to his home country of Pakistan to work with victims of acid violence.  Every year hundreds of people – mostly women – are attacked with acid in Pakistan but the vast majority of cases aren’t reported.  And Pakistan is just one of many countries with increasing instances of this horrible crime.

Space Dive   
National Geographic Channel
Millions around the world held their breath as they watched Felix Baumgartner step off of the ledge of his space capsule and plummet to Earth – breaking the world record for a free fall jump from higher than 120,000 feet and becoming the first person to free fall while breaking the sound barrier. National Geographic Channel’s ground-breaking special Space Dive allowed viewers to witness a mission fraught with epic challenges as a team of leading experts pushed the boundaries of science to design and build the equipment needed to get Baumgartner to the edge of space and back. 

POV   
The City Dark
PBS

The world’s first light bulb was switched on in 1879, and since then artificial illumination has spread across an increasingly urban globe, radically changing humanity’s relation to the night. Yet light pollution is a phenomenon little noted except by those, like astronomers, whose endeavors have been directly hindered by the changes. The City Dark follows filmmaker Ian Cheney’s journey to discover the surprising and alarming costs of light pollution and the disappearance of the night sky.

 

OUTSTANDING NATURE PROGRAMMING

Winged Planet          
Discovery Channel
Award winning filmmaker John Downer developed a new team of Spycams to offer viewers a jaw-dropping view of the world from an entirely different perspective.  As these remarkable birds fly, they use the landscapes below them to navigate, search for food, roost and migrate. Spycams allow viewers a moving three-dimensional view as they ride on the backs of spectacular eagles, cranes, pelicans, snow geese and countless other birds while they soar above some of the most awe-inspiring parts of America, Africa and Europe.

War Elephants                   
National Geographic Channel
Mozambique’s 16-year civil war was devastating for elephants – and today their struggles shed new light on elephant intelligence, but also on the human resolve and bravery required to save these embattled giants.  Gorongosa National Park was once the crown jewel of Southern Africa. Today it is on the mend and slowly recovering from the ravages of war.  At the center of the struggle are Gorongosa’s iconic elephants: Titans who once numbered in the thousands until the brutal war reduced their numbers to barely 100. The survivors are now suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD), an illness normally associated with war-ravaged humans.

Nature          
An Original DUCKumentary
PBS
“An Original DUCKumentary” takes viewers past the familiar first impression of these much loved creatures to uncover the truly remarkable abilities they possess.  Ducks are beautiful, but they are more than that. They are tough, accomplished survivors with abilities that will amaze you. From ducks in the tropics of South America to ducks that winter in the high Arctic, these are serious lives, demanding and dangerous. The film helps the audience relate to these beautiful birds, while showing how just how extraordinary they really are. 

Nature          
Ocean Giants
PBS

Blue whales are three times larger than the largest dinosaurs - over a hundred feet long and eating the equivalent of an elephant every day.  Yet despite their size, they are creatures of mystery. In many ways giant whales are totally alien to us. In others, with their mental ability, group communication and the recent discovery that they have individual names, they are very similar to us. “Ocean Giants” set out on an ambitious quest to track down the last remaining giant baleen whales to gain a new understanding of their lives and why they have grown so large.

Nature          
Siberian Tiger Quest
PBS

Hunted almost to extinction, the last wild Siberian tigers can only be found in the forests of the far eastern Russian frontier.  And they had never been filmed in the wild, until one man went to new extremes in order to succeed where all others had failed.  Filmmaker Sooyong Park spent more than five years alone in the wild, confined for months in tiny pits in the ground or 4-foot hides in trees, watching and waiting for even a glimpse of the elusive creatures.  Then, in 2005, after incomprehensible hardship and devotion to his task, Park emerged from the frozen forests with over a thousand extraordinary hours of wild tiger footage that told the story of three generations of a Russian tiger dynasty.

 

BEST STORY IN A REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

ABC News Nightline  
Brian Ross Investigates: Undercover Grandma
ABC

At a time when healthcare costs are at the heart of the national political debate, government officials estimate that $60 billion dollars of taxpayer money are lost to Medicare fraud every year. An undercover investigation by ABC News used hidden cameras and a grandmother to reveal how a simple trip to the doctor’s office can result in misdiagnosis, expensive treatments, unnecessary health care supplies and costly fraud.

ABC World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline
Brian Ross Investigates: Tragedy in Bangladesh
ABC

The investigative team documented the trail of accountability from the dangerous garment factories in Bangladesh to U.S. stores where top US retailers sell their clothing. The multi-part ABC News investigation has been credited with creating real change for the workers who toil hidden in factories far from the eyes of American consumers.

ABC World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline
Hidden America: Don't Shoot I Want to Grow Up
ABC

2012 was a year of devastating loss in Chicago, as the city ended the year with over 500 homicides.  Diane Sawyer sat down to an unprecedented conversation with 50 rival Chicago gang members to discuss solutions to the violence plaguing their city.

CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley
On The Road: The Longest Wait
CBS

Tour guides at the American cemetery in Normandy, France had been telling the story for years.  They had been telling tourists about the widow of a World War II airman who, on occasion, still visited her husband's grave. When CBS Evening News started looking into this story they thought that's all there was to it.  But after weeks of digging through documents and talking with family, CBS Evening News learned this widow's devotion was only a small part of the story.

CBS This Morning     
"Note to Self" Series
CBS

CBS News set out to bring the viewer a different take on the sit-down interview, asking each participant one question: If you could write a letter of advice to your younger self what would you say? They presented the unique yet simple concept to people from all walks of life, and the final products turned out to be poignant and, as one author described them, “pretty damn inspiring.”

NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams       
Inside Syria
NBC

As the conflict in Syria escalated in 2012, with the death toll rising to an estimated 60,000, correspondent Richard Engel, spent months in the country on multiple reporting assignments. Throughout the year, Engel chronicled the growing effectiveness of the rebel movement in its campaign to drive President Assad from power – effective in that the rebels were eventually able to assert control over key cities such as Homs and Aleppo, where there was considerable opposition to the government. At the same time, the rebel gains were met by an increasingly aggressive response by the Assad regime. In mid-December, Engel and his NBC colleagues were taken hostage by an unknown group and told they would be used to secure the release of hostages held by Syrian rebels. Although they were not harmed physically, Engel recalled that “they made us choose which one of us would be shot first, and when we refused there were mock shootings.” After five days they were freed when their captors were stopped at a checkpoint.

Today
American Story: Payback Painter
NBC

Doctors were preparing Todd Spaur for life in a wheel chair, after a terrible car crash broke his back, his neck and most of the bones in his face. But neighbors back in Bussey, Iowa, had another idea. They offered to look after the single dad's three kids while he tried to prove the doctors wrong. They did that until the father with 9 steel plates in his body and a fractured fifth vertebra walked again.

 

BEST REPORT IN A NEWS MAGAZINE

60 Minutes    
Aleppo
CBS

The Syrian Civil War is taking lives and wrecking cities like Aleppo, the country's largest. Clarissa Ward gets inside the country to report on its civilian victims, the rebels who the West is refusing to support and Islamic militants who some fear will hijack the revolution.

60 Minutes    
Killing Bin Laden
CBS

A first-hand account of the raid that killed the world's most wanted terrorist from one of the Navy SEALs who pulled the trigger. Scott Pelley interviews "Mark Owen," a former SEAL who was in the room when Osama bin Laden died from American bullets, in his only interview. "Owen," a pseudonym he uses for security, recalls each step of the mission and the preparation he and the nation's elite force made for it, in order to give credit to his SEAL comrades and the hundreds of others whose work played a role in the successful mission.

60 Minutes    
Stem Cell Fraud
CBS

Stem cells still have not proven to be the panacea many claimed they could be, yet the Internet is alive with stem cells for sale to treat incurable illnesses. Scott Pelley reports on one man offering to treat cerebral palsy who a respected stem cell researcher says could be endangering patients.

60 Minutes    
The Cost of Admission
CBS

Steve Kroft investigates allegations from doctors that the hospital chain they worked for pressured them to admit patients regardless of their medical needs.

Dateline NBC 
Conviction
NBC

NBC News' reporting for “Conviction” began in 2002, when Dateline Producer Dan Slepian received a letter from Jon Adrian Velazquez, a convicted murderer at New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility.  From behind bars, Velazquez wrote to the producer insisting that he was innocent.  Slepian began to dig, finding and reading thousands of pages of trial testimony, police reports and court briefs.   After a thorough analysis, it became apparent there were serious questions concerning the evidence.  Ultimately, the broadcast triggered the Manhattan District Attorney’s office to officially reopen and reinvestigate the case as part of its newly created “Conviction Integrity Unit.”

Need to Know                   
Crossing the Line at the Border
PBS

“Crossing the Line at the Border” examines the death of Anastasio Hernandez Rojas, an undocumented immigrant who had a fatal heart attack shortly after being subdued by agents, beaten, and shot with a Taser gun at the San Ysidro border crossing on May 28th, 2010.  PBS also looked more broadly into a culture of abuse that has been allowed to fester within the Border Patrol.  The team traveled to Nogales, Mexico to speak with individuals who were detained by the Border patrol and were denied sufficient food, water, medical attention, and were allegedly physically assaulted by border agents.

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY

HBO Documentary Films     
Project NIM
HBO

PROJECT NIM follows an individual chimpanzee through infancy and adolescence to adulthood, showing both his emerging behavior and its impact on the humans who lived around him.  There are many intriguing behavioral overlaps between humans and chimpanzees explored in the film, but it’s the differences between the species that really shape Nim’s life with humans and determine his unhappy fate. The paradox and heartbreak for the humans around Nim is that he can scratch and bite people whom he seems genuinely to like. The heartbreak for Nim is that he cannot be any other way and, as he gets stronger, this will guarantee his virtual imprisonment. As the research veterinarian, James Mahoney, later observes in the film: “once you put them in a cage, it’s all downhill from then on…”

HBO Documentary Films     
Saving Face
HBO

SAVING FACE follows the journey of reconstructive surgeon Dr. Mohammad Jawad as he travels to his home country of Pakistan to work with victims of acid violence.  Every year hundreds of people – mostly women – are attacked with acid in Pakistan but the vast majority of cases aren’t reported.  And Pakistan is just one of many countries with increasing instances of this horrible crime.

HBO Documentary Films     
The Loving Story
HBO

A racially-charged criminal trial and a heart-rending love story converge in this documentary about Mildred and Richard Loving, a part-black, part-Indian woman married to a white man in Jim Crow era Virginia. Thrown into rat-infested jails and exiled from their hometown for 25 years, the Lovings fought back and changed history. They were paired with two young and ambitious lawyers who were driven to pave the way for social justice and equal rights through a historic Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia. THE LOVING STORY takes us on a journey into the heart of race relations in America. But, in the end, it is a poignant story of two people who simply wanted to chose who they could love and marry and live in the place they called home.

HBO Documentary Films     
The Tsunami and The Cherry Blossom
HBO

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom came from a desire to tell the story of the Japanese people and the tragedy of March 11th, 2011 in a uniquely cinematic way. Each story in the film is structured around the arc of grieving, and contains a narrative progression – from shock and devastation to acceptance and hope as blossom season arrives, undeterred by the destructive forces of the tsunami. The people featured suffer a loss in Winter – but as Spring arrives, they dig deep and find a way to move forward: Winter gives way to Spring, destruction to renewal. The resulting film is a visual haiku which meditates on the fragility of life, but also on the wonderful inevitability of rebirth and regeneration.

Independent Lens    
Hell and Back Again
PBS

What does it mean to lead men in war? What does it mean to come home - injured physically and psychologically - and build a life anew?  In HELL AND BACK AGAIN, two overlapping narratives are intercut – the life of a Marine at war on the front, and the life of the same Marine in recovery at home. Within hours of being dropped deep behind enemy lines, Sergeant Nathan Harris’s unit is attacked from all sides. The parallel story begins with Sergeant Harris’s return home to his wife in the US, after he is severely injured. He’s in terrible physical pain, and becomes addicted to his pain medication. But his psychological pain may be worse, as he attempts to reconcile the immense gulf between his experiences at war, and the terrifying normalcy of life at home. These two stories intertwine to communicate both the extraordinary drama of war and the no less shocking experience of returning home, as a whole generation of Marines struggles to find an identity in a country that prefers to be indifferent.

POV   
Nostalgia for the Light
PBS

Director Patricio Guzmán traveled to the Atacama Desert to talk to the astronomers who gaze into starlight for cosmic truth; the archeologists who dig to bring the truth of human history into the light; and the haunted relatives of the disappeared who still sift the parched ground for traces of a more recent history — the victims of Pinochet's dictatorship.

 

NEW APPROACHES: CURRENT NEWS COVERAGE

Center for Investigative Reporting
In Jennifer's Room
Jennifer’s body was a crime scene. Dark bruises shaped like handprints covered her breasts. Bite marks broke the skin on her arms and back. It was August 2006, and Jennifer, then a 31-year-old patient with mental retardation and bipolar disorder living at the Sonoma Developmental Center, said a caregiver molested her.  The center has its own internal police force, which opened an investigation. But detectives did hardly any investigating, failing even to check for physical evidence with a “rape kit” exam. The allegation relied on the word of a woman with intellectual disabilities. Case closed.  A few months later, officials at the center had indisputable evidence that a crime had occurred: Jennifer was pregnant. Reporter Ryan Gabrielson exposed the depths of the abuse inside California's five state-run developmental centers. Senior multimedia producer Carrie Ching directed and produced this "graphic novel" multimedia feature.

FRONTLINE  
Targeting the Electorate
PBS
Leading up to the 2012 election, FRONTLINE sought to provide a unique and accessible way to explain the important and dramatic changes in how campaigns were raising and spending money.  FRONTLINE began to investigate the way digital media allows campaigns to collect and use unprecedented amounts of personal data to target paid advertising. The Targeting the Electorate site automatically detects a user’s location, and asks a series of simple questions – such as the user’s party registration, gender and media usage. Using that information, the site then presents each user with one almost 100 possible experiences, and allows them to explore how the Obama and Romney campaigns may have targeted them through text, audio and video interviews with experts and campaign staffers.

Slate V          
Political Kombat '12
Slate

Slate V's Political Kombat '12 is an animated, five-episode web series aimed at modern news consumers that tells the story of the 2012 presidential race as a succession of video game battles. Modeled after the cult classic video game, Mortal Kombat, Political Kombat ‘12 features digital mock ups of key figures in this past presidential election battling each other to the death (of their campaign), wielding customized weapons derived from the biographies, rhetoric and gaffes that made news on the campaign trail. A viewer of Political Kombat ’12 is left with an insightful and amusing take on the major conflicts that played out during the campaign, all meticulously and faithfully rendered in a video game format that has broad appeal.

Breakdown: Death and Disarray at America's Racetracks
The New York Times
May 7, 2011 was a dangerous day in horseracing. As horses thundered around racetracks from New York to Hollywood, dramatic videos show accident after accident, horses and jockeys going down, and all too often with devastating consequences. The New York Times multimedia series, “Breakdown: Death and Disarray at America’s Racetracks” investigates why there are so many problems with the sport of kings today.

Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek
The New York Times
The first thing you see when you open “Snow Fall” is the movement of ice and wind, rushing over the face of a frozen slope. When you begin to read this experiment in long form journalism by The New York Times, the writer John Branch immediately puts you in the center of a violent and deadly avalanche. You follow one of the skiers caught in the churning snow, and soon enough, you hear this character’s voice in an interview that sits alongside the written narrative. “I didn’t know which way was up. I didn’t know which way was down. I couldn’t see anything. I couldn’t breathe,” she says. “Snow Fall” represents a new approach to documentary programming.  The project isn’t a written story with multimedia elements hanging off the side. It’s one story that includes the written word, video, animated graphics, photography and audio. The experience of the story shifts among these elements, going from reading to watching to reading to listening and back to reading again. And you never notice that you’re doing something other than following the tale of 16 skiers and snowboarders who went outside a ski area looking for fresh powder, but found disaster instead.
         
How Much Science is in Forensic Science?
The Washington Post
A Washington Post investigation uncovered that Justice Department officials have known for years that flawed forensic work might have led to the convictions of potentially innocent people, but prosecutors failed to notify defendants or their attorneys even in many cases they knew were troubled. The Post's package included video profiles of two men who were jailed because of the errors, a database of convictions linked to the FBI lab's suspect forensics and an interactive graphic explaining the reliability of different types of analysis in addition to the extensive print stories. Because of The Washington Post's groundbreaking work, two convictions already have been vacated and judges have taken the extraordinary step of declaring the two men innocent. The Justice Department now is reviewing 20,000-plus criminal cases that may have relied on the weak science and misleading testimony that were exposed by The Post's print and web stories in the largest federal post-conviction inquiry ever undertaken in the United States.

 

NEW APPROACHES: DOCUMENTARIES

The Martin Agency/Tool     
Clouds Over Cuba
The JFK Presidential Library & Museum

Clouds Over Cuba is an interactive multimedia documentary commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. The feature begins with Castro’s overthrow of Batista in 1959, and continues on until the missiles were removed in October 1962. Features include 15 expert interviews on related topics, a dossier of 200 related documents and images linked to the timeline of the film, mobile sync, tablet optimization, and calendar integration so you can attend JFK’s secret meetings “live,” 50 years later. Finally, a “What If?” short film depicts an alternate 2012 in which the crisis had escalated into nuclear war.­

Slavery's Last Stronghold
CNN Digital
Two CNN Digital reporters traveled to Mauritania -- a West African nation that became the last country in the world to abolish slavery -- to document a practice the Mauritanian government denies still exists.  They met people who’ve never known freedom; people who escaped slavery to find their lives hadn't changed; and abolitionists who have been fighting against slavery for years with minimal results. It was only five years ago -- in 2007 -- that the country finally passed a law that making slavery a crime. So far, only one slave owner has been convicted.
                  
Memphis Poverty: What Obama Didn't See
The Commercial Appeal
At age 18, Chris Dean gained national attention when he introduced President Barack Obama at his graduation from Booker T. Washington High School in Memphis, Tennessee.  In 2011, Memphis was named by the U.S. Census Bureau as the poorest large metropolis in America. Against all forces, Dean managed to bridge the enormous chasm between life in the poorest neighborhood of the poorest city in America to the shining moment when he was noticed worldwide for his charming introduction of the president of the United States. 

Op-Docs
The New York Times
The New York Times has extended Op-Ed’s mission by creating Op-Docs: our first-ever online forum for independent filmmakers and artists to voice their views on current affairs, contemporary life and historical subjects. In 2012, the project’s first full year, Op-Docs published 43 videos on nytimes.com. Each is a world premiere, accompanied by a written director’s statement and viewer comments. Our emphasis has been on creative experimentation; rigorous journalistic standards; a wide variety of topics, viewpoints and artistic approaches; and the use of documentaries to engage viewers in a continuing public discourse.

Powering A Nation   
100 Gallons: How Water Powers Life
UNC Chapel Hill/ Powering a Nation
Water is the source of all life and the cause of much death. But in this country, we are generally unconscious of our dependence on it. Powering a Nation’s documentary project “100 Gallons” uses evocative storytelling and innovative multimedia design to examine our complex relationship with this nurturing resource and the perpetual cycle of water on our planet.

 

NEW APPROACHES: ARTS, LIFESTYLE, CULTURE

           
Walking with Giants
National Geographic Magazine Digital Edition
It’s one of Easter Island’s biggest mysteries: How were hundreds of giant statues moved across the landscape centuries ago, over distances as long as 11 miles, by people who lacked both draft animals and wheels?  To illustrate how the giant statues – or moai – may have been moved, video director and animator Hans Weise, staff artist Fernando Baptista and producer Spencer Millsap created an animated film that would demonstrate how each theory worked.

The Picture Show
Lost And Found: Discover A Black-And-White Era In Full Color
NPR

NPR’s “Lost & Found” project started with amazing buildings blocks: The intriguing biography of unknown amateur photographer Charles Cushman, his enormous archive containing some of the earliest known Kodachrome slides; and the story of its discovery years later.  Those building blocks catalyzed an exercise in re-thinking web storytelling. In removing the confines of video, NPR hoped to reconstruct a story more natural in -- and native to -- the web environment. To do that, they used Popcorn.js -- an HTML5 framework for integrating video and the web in time-based interaction. The project is responsive on multiple devices and is further malleable: In the spirit of public media, the source code is public, open to anyone who wants to experiment with it. The piece is a pilot project that scratches the surface of what’s possible, just a step in the perpetuity of great storytelling.

POV | StoryCorps Animated Series
PBS
The mission of StoryCorps is to preserve stories of everyday American life, with the core of the institution being the radio interview session. Starting in 2010, StoryCorps collaborated with Mike and Tim Rauch and POV on a new project adapting some of their best-loved radio stories for television with animated documentary shorts. The POV | StoryCorps Animated Series is created with an exceptional degree of artistry and care. Each story is painstakingly researched—locations visited, archival photos examined—and created with the full cooperation of the story’s subjects. They are among the few entirely hand-drawn animations left on American television today. In a time when “reality” television is flooding most television networks, POV | StoryCorps Animated Series stands out as a pure and honest representation of everyday American life.

POV   
Sound of Vision
PBS

Sound of Vision follows native New Yorker Frank Senior, who has been blind since birth and subsequently has no concept of light or dark. Frank takes filmmakers through the streets of New York, recounting his past experiences and guiding them through his interactions with people and places. Frank elaborates, “The voice tells me everything about you. You might look at the color of a person’s eyes. I’m listening to the color of a person’s voice; color of personality.”

Life, Interrupted
The New York Times
In “Life, Interrupted,” a series of weekly columns on The New York Times ‘Well’ blog, 23-year old Suleika Jaouad writes about her fight against leukemia and her experiences as a young adult with cancer. Times video journalist Shayla Harris’ video portraits trace Suleika’s path from chemotherapy through a bone marrow transplant – her only shot at a cure - and allow viewers to follow her on a journey marked by fear, hope and love. Harris captures heartbreaking moments in hospital rooms, intimate moments between family members, and candid interviews with Suleika and her close-knit circle, about the emotional toll of cancer. Social media helped propel the story into one of the most watched series on the Times site.

 

OUTSTANDING WRITING

ABC News Nightline  
Amazing Race: Organ Donation
ABC

Every day, 18 people die while waiting for an organ to be donated.  In order to put a face on the massive need for donated organs, Bill Weir visited the Mayo Clinic and spent time with the patients, surgical teams and support staff caught in a waiting game of life and death. 

60 Minutes    
A Hard Landing
CBS

Seven thousand employees of the Kennedy Space Center lost their jobs when the final Space Shuttle was launched last July, a loss of income that's hit the local economy hard.

60 Minutes    
Joy in the Congo
CBS

The Congo's Kimbanguist Symphony Orchestra grew from one man's dream to 200 musicians and vocalists providing joy to the mostly poor, bleak capital of Kinshasa. It's now the only symphony orchestra in Central Africa and the only all-black one in the world.

60 Minutes    
Remembering Mike Wallace
CBS

60 MINUTES devoted its entire hour to its beloved colleague and founding correspondent, Mike Wallace, who died on April 7 at the age of 93. The script of the broadcast reflects the man himself: informative but entertaining, tough-minded, funny, occasionally outrageous. The broadcast hewed pretty closely to Wallace’s formula for a successful report: just tell the story.  And keep it moving.

60 Minutes    
The Cost of Admission
CBS

Steve Kroft investigates allegations from doctors that the hospital chain they worked for pressured them to admit patients regardless of their medical needs. The aim in writing the script for “The Cost of Admission” was to distill to its essence more than a year of reporting. Clear and accessible writing shed light on American health care through the story of a complex system that maximized a company’s bottom line.

Nick Paton Walsh: Reports from Syria and Afghanistan
CNN
Nick Paton Walsh’s poetic writing contrasts with the sobering environments from which his stories are usually drawn.  His reports punch through the daily accounts of wounded and dead and give us a fresh way to see the grinding pitilessness of war, and its quirky inconsistencies.

Nature         
An Original DUCKumentary
PBS
“An Original DUCKumentary” takes viewers past the familiar first impression of these much loved creatures to uncover the truly remarkable abilities they possess.  Ducks are beautiful, but they are more than that. They are tough, accomplished survivors with abilities that will amaze you. From ducks in the tropics of South America to ducks that winter in the high Arctic, these are serious lives, demanding and dangerous. The narrative takes on the job of weaving the surprising and the familiar together in an entertaining and informative story. 

 

OUTSTANDING RESEARCH

60 Minutes    
The Cost of Admission
CBS

Steve Kroft investigates allegations from doctors that the hospital chain they worked for pressured them to admit patients regardless of their medical needs. Research focused on the admission and billing practices of Health Management Associates, and was channeled to uncover examples of the kind of conduct that contributes to the hundreds of billions in waste and unnecessary care in the American health care system.

The Martin Agency/Tool     
Clouds Over Cuba
The JFK Presidential Library & Museum

Clouds Over Cuba is an interactive multimedia documentary commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. The feature begins with Castro’s overthrow of Batista in 1959, and continues on until the missiles were removed in October 1962. Features include 15 expert interviews on related topics, a dossier of 200 related documents and images linked to the timeline of the film, mobile sync, tablet optimization, and calendar integration so you can attend JFK’s secret meetings “live,” 50 years later.­ The research conducted for Clouds Over Cuba was unique in that it didn’t just aid in development of the documentary. In many cases, the research materials themselves became content for the experience, delivered in a way that allows the audience to opt-in for as much information as they desire. 
Researchers:  Brian Williams, Wade Alger, Ben Tricklebank, Nicole Hollis-Vitale, Kristen Little, Kristen Koeller, Karen Dola

HBO Documentary Films     
Saving Face
HBO

SAVING FACE follows the journey of reconstructive surgeon Dr. Mohammad Jawad as he travels to his home country of Pakistan to work with victims of acid violence.  Every year hundreds of people – mostly women – are attacked with acid in Pakistan but the vast majority of cases aren’t reported.  Research for the film involved: interviewing dozens of acid survivors; tracking down perpetrators and convincing them to agree to be filmed; investigating the psychological dimensions of domestic violence in Pakistan; investigating the Pakistani legal system and the process of defending victims of acid attacks.

HBO Documentary Films     
Vito
HBO

Vito Russo was one of the most outspoken and inspiring activists in the LGBT community’s fight for equal rights. He was a pivotal part of three well-known organizations during their formative years - GAA (Gay Activists Alliance), GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation), and ACT UP (AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power).  His seminal book “The Celluloid Closet” explored the ways in which gays and lesbians were portrayed on film, and how those negative images were at the root of society’s homophobia. He continued writing, lecturing, speaking out and acting up until just months before his death in 1990. Vito lived a big life, which from a research point of view is both a blessing and curse.  The challenge was to select materials that put the audience inside Vito’s life.  One crucial discovery was the nearly 30-year old master tapes of Vito’s New York public television show ‘Our Time’--a priceless time capsule of gay issues in the early eighties.

American Experience          
Jesse Owens
PBS

He was the most famous athlete of his time, whose stunning triumph at the 1936 Olympic Games of four gold medals captivated the world, even as it infuriated the Nazis. Despite the racial slurs he endured, his grace and athleticism rallied crowds around the world. Yet when Jesse Owens returned home, he came back to a segregated America where he couldn’t even ride in the front of a bus. One of the main goals of research was to bring to life an event more than 75 years old. Researchers were instructed to literally comb the globe to find as much unique archival material as possible: “footraces” for the early Americana scenes that paints a portrait of how the world of track and field evolved during Jesse Owens’ childhood; footage of all the events Owens competed in at the 1936 Berlin Olympics; early newsreels of Owens talking, showing him as an athlete, a spokesman and as a strong black man gracefully navigating a segregated America and Nazi Germany.

American Experience          
The Amish
PBS

The first question the filmmakers asked themselves when beginning research into the film The Amish was “can we make an intimate and personal film about people who refuse to be photographed?”  They wanted the Amish to tell their own story, and the only way to include authentic Amish voices was to embrace their avoidance of photography and agree to use only audio recordings.  The filmmakers’ spent months in Amish communities, proving that they understood their life and their faith, and gaining the trust necessary for the Amish to grant audio interviews. This primary research was underpinned with deep historical and pictorial research that accurately reflects the changes in Amish culture and the widening gap between the Amish and the rest of America. The result was one of the most watched American Experience broadcasts in nine years.

MLK: The Assassination Tapes      
Smithsonian Channel
April 4, 1968. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is gunned down on the balcony of a hotel in Memphis, Tennessee. It was all caught on film, tape and audio. So why have we seen so little of it? The well-known photograph of Dr. King's aides pointing toward the direction of the gunfire is iconic, but tells only part of the story. For the first time, a remarkable collection of recently rediscovered footage has been chronologically reassembled. The resulting documentary allows us to revisit the tumultuous events surrounding one of the most shocking assassinations in America and relive history through the voices of the era.

 

OUTSTANDING VIDEO JOURNALISM: NEWS

Dan Rather Reports  
In the Running
AXS TV

On the eve of the London Olympics, Dan Rather Reports took viewers to a tiny town with the highest concentration of running talent on Earth. Iten, Kenya has no stoplights; few residents have running water; and a sign of success is owning a cow. But this speck on the map is home to more world-class runners than anywhere else, including almost everyone on Kenya’s 2012 Olympic team. This story is supported with cinematography that is both grand and personal, portraying the beauty of the African continent, while also focusing on the unparalleled determination and grueling work ethic of these athletes as they share candid moments with their coaches and dedicate their days to their sport.

60 Minutes    
The Sport of Kings
CBS

Polo is one of the oldest organized sports in the world and its leading star, Ignacio "Nacho" Figueras, plays it with a style befitting his other role as the face of Ralph Lauren's iconic fashion brand, Polo. The success of this story hinged on the cinematographers bringing Polo to life through action shots that conveyed the power and intensity of the game to the viewer: They used high-speed cameras to slow the action to 1000 frames per second; they used mini-cams mounted on horses, riders and even polo sticks to bring viewers right into the center of the action; they used the bumpy platform of a fast moving truck to get just in front of a speeding horses; and they employed cherry-pickers and even a helicopter to give viewers an extraordinary view.    

Americas Now                  
Melting Point
CCTV America

Greenland is the world’s largest island. So much of its two million square kilometers is encased in ice. The ice sheet there – the largest outside Antarctica – helps cool our entire planet; and it was melting. Over the course of four days in July 2012, 97 percent of the ice sheet’s surface turned into water. How would this phenomenon affect global warming and the rising level of our seas? Was this meltdown seasonal, or a once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon? Videographer Snorre Wik – and Washington Correspondent Sean Callebs – travelled to one of the more remote locations on earth to put these questions to the scientists who documented the melt, and to the native Inuit people who live there.

Dateline NBC 
Conviction
NBC

NBC News' reporting for “Conviction” began in 2002, when Dateline Producer Dan Slepian received a letter from Jon Adrian Velazquez, a convicted murderer at New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility.  From behind bars, Velazquez wrote to the producer insisting that he was innocent.  Slepian began to dig, finding and reading thousands of pages of trial testimony, police reports and court briefs.   After a thorough analysis, it became apparent there were serious questions concerning the evidence.  Ultimately, the broadcast triggered the Manhattan District Attorney’s office to officially reopen and reinvestigate the case as part of its newly created “Conviction Integrity Unit.”

Rock Center with Brian Williams     
Tomb Raiders
NBC

After the revolution many of Egypt’s famous antiquities sites have been looted and destroyed.  To uncover some of it, all you have to do is excavate where professional archeologists have pointed the way. That’s exactly what happened to archeologist Carol Redmount and the ancient town of El Hibeh, trashed by a small army of armed looters.  Redmount has returned regularly to Egypt for almost 30 years. But nothing prepared her for what she discovered when she came back after the revolution: mummy body parts  scattered about and chewed on by foxes and wild dogs,  ancient tombs that she didn’t even know existed,  pillaged and left open in the dessert air,  and unarmed antiquities inspectors intimidated by  an escaped murderer who had shot at  them.

 

OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY: DOCUMENTARY AND LONG FORM

Winged Planet         
Discovery Channel
Award winning filmmaker John Downer developed a new team of Spycams to offer viewers a jaw-dropping view of the world from an entirely different perspective.  As these remarkable birds fly, they use the landscapes below them to navigate, search for food, roost and migrate. Spycams allow viewers a moving three-dimensional view as they ride on the backs of spectacular eagles, cranes, pelicans, snow geese and countless other birds while they soar above some of the most awe-inspiring parts of America, Africa and Europe.

HBO Documentary Films     
Saving Face
HBO

SAVING FACE follows the journey of reconstructive surgeon Dr. Mohammad Jawad as he travels to his home country of Pakistan to work with victims of acid violence.  Every year hundreds of people – mostly women – are attacked with acid in Pakistan but the vast majority of cases aren’t reported.  And Pakistan is just one of many countries with increasing instances of this horrible crime. The filming techniques are primarily traditional vérité techniques, capitalizing on the immediacy and intimacy of moments critical to the story.  The goal of the cinematography, like that of the film, was not to revel in the horror of these crimes but to portray the dignity we found in the survivors. 

Inocente      
MTV
The main goal of Inocente was to show the incredible journey this 15-year-old has undertaken, overcoming very painful and difficult circumstances of violence, homelessness, parental betrayal, and show how her art was her armor and lifeline. After choosing to pin the narrative structure upon the culmination of Inocente’s first art show, her preparation allowed MTV to unfold her history in the creation of each painting, so as time moves forward towards her big debut, we are also moving back in time as each painting she creates reveals another aspect of her history.         

Untamed Americas   
National Geographic Channel
An epic yet intimate journey through the Americas, from Alaska to Patagonia, featuring some of the most dramatic and surprising wildlife survival stories on our planet. The Americas are a land of superlatives: with the world’s longest mountains, the Andes; largest rain forest, the Amazon, and the driest desert, the Atacama. A large range of cinematic techniques were used to reveal the Americas in all their glory. From aerial photography to macro, endoscopy, motion control time lapse, ultra slow motion, underwater, night vision, stabilized boat mounts and long lenses – whatever it took to capture the place and story, on whatever scale, no matter what the conditions.

Ice Bear       
National Geographic Wild
Shot entirely in native 3D, over 12 months in the Canadian Arctic, Ice Bear takes us on journey with a teenage polar bear in his first summer ever, alone, as he struggles to survive the longest and hottest summer on record in the north. Capturing breath-taking cinematography of rarely seen behaviour, we witness the teenager scaling a 250-metre cliff; attacking a herd of walrus; and a confrontation with a cub-killing wolf. This is an intimate, and up-close portrait of the white bear like you’ve never seen it before, set against the biggest story of our generation: climate change. Instincts, curiosity and intelligence are the only defence our teenager has against a world changing faster then he can. Is this the twilight of an Arctic Icon?

Nature         
An Original DUCKumentary
PBS
Filming for “An Original DUCKumentary” required an enormous amount of expertise about duck behavior, and unlimited patience.  Ducks in the wild are heavily hunted and notoriously skittish.  Cinematographer Michael Male devised a one-of-a-kind blind that resembles a floating island and spent untold hours in cold water inching ever closer to wild ducks. Andrew Young kept constant watch over one upstate New York location, following a single family for an entire summer.  Ann Johnson Prum built beautiful tree nests lit entirely with natural light and filmed females laying eggs and ducklings hatching. The team that included Matt Bradbury built underwater habitats that enabled the audience to dive with feeding ducks. And Joel Heath captured Eiders feeding under the ice in Hudson’s Bay in scenes that took seven years in the field to achieve. 

 

OUTSTANDING EDITING: NEWS

60 Minutes    
Joy in the Congo
CBS

The Congo's Kimbanguist Symphony Orchestra grew from one man's dream to 200 musicians and vocalists providing joy to the mostly poor, bleak capital of Kinshasa. It's now the only symphony orchestra in Central Africa and the only all-black one in the world. The editing helps the story along by letting it unfold, allowing the heartwarming effect of the music, the personal struggles of the players and the brilliant triumphs of the Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra shine to the viewers.

60 Minutes    
Lion Kings
CBS

Few people know more about lions than filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert, who have been living in the bush and filming Africa's big cats for 30 years. The editing takes the rich and varied visual and sound elements gathered in the field, and key moments from the Jouberts’ films, and weaves them into a compelling narrative.

60 Minutes    
The Sport of Kings
CBS

Polo is one of the oldest organized sports in the world and its leading star, Ignacio "Nacho" Figueras, plays it with a style befitting his other role as the face of Ralph Lauren's iconic fashion brand, Polo. This piece truly came together in the edit room. A key example occurs in the first several minutes, when viewers go inside the experience of a charity polo match on Governor’s Island. The scene required the splicing together of footage of the VIP cocktail reception, helicopter footage, match footage, horse audio, player audio and crowd audio. The result is a symphony of sound and picture that captures the power of the animals, the spirit of the event and the thrill of the game.  

Dateline NBC 
Conviction
NBC

NBC News' reporting for “Conviction” began in 2002, when Dateline Producer Dan Slepian received a letter from Jon Adrian Velazquez, a convicted murderer at New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility.  From behind bars, Velazquez wrote to the producer insisting that he was innocent.  Slepian began to dig, finding and reading thousands of pages of trial testimony, police reports and court briefs.   After a thorough analysis, it became apparent there were serious questions concerning the evidence.  Ultimately, the broadcast triggered the Manhattan District Attorney’s office to officially reopen and reinvestigate the case as part of its newly created “Conviction Integrity Unit.”

 

OUTSTANDING EDITING: DOCUMENTARY AND LONG FORM

HBO Documentary Films     
Marina Abramović: The Artist is Present
HBO
Seductive, fearless, and outrageous, Marina Abramović has been redefining what art is for nearly forty years. Using her own body as a vehicle, pushing herself beyond her physical and mental limits, and at times risking her life in the process, she creates performances that challenge, shock, and move us. Through her and with her, boundaries are crossed, consciousness expanded––and art as we know it is reborn. At once a glamorous art-world idol, a lightning rod for controversy, and a myth of her own making, Marina is also, quite simply, one of the most compelling artists of our time. Editor E. Donna Shepherd faced two primary challenges. First, how to translate Abramovic’s art to the medium of cinema--how to bring the viewer into the dynamic between the artist, her work and the engagement of the live audience participants? Second, to see the performance apart from the woman--to see, and then capture, the vulnerability underneath the charisma.

HBO Documentary Films     
Saving Face
HBO

SAVING FACE follows the journey of reconstructive surgeon Dr. Mohammad Jawad as he travels to his home country of Pakistan to work with victims of acid violence.  Every year hundreds of people – mostly women – are attacked with acid in Pakistan but the vast majority of cases aren’t reported.  And Pakistan is just one of many countries with increasing instances of this horrible crime. The editing focuses on the emotional impact of the injuries resulting from acid attacks, and the goal, like that of the film, is to portray the dignity of the survivors.

HBO Documentary Films     
The Loving Story
HBO

A racially-charged criminal trial and a heart-rending love story converge in this documentary about Mildred and Richard Loving, a part-black, part-Indian woman married to a white man in Jim Crow era Virginia. Thrown into rat-infested jails and exiled from their hometown for 25 years, the Lovings fought back and changed history. They were paired with two young and ambitious lawyers who were driven to pave the way for social justice and equal rights through a historic Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia. Using shots from recently rediscovered 16mm footage filmed in cinema vérité style, a series of magnificent black and white photographs, and the voices of the people who actually experienced the events, the filmmakers have crafted a love-story-cum-legal-thriller, a poignant story of two people who simply wanted to chose who they could love and marry and live in the place they called home.

FRONTLINE  
The Interrupters
PBS

Shot over the course of a year, The Interrupters captures the streets of Chicago during a period of widespread violence that drew nationwide attention, most notably the brutal beating of Derrion Albert, a Chicago High School student whose death was caught on videotape. Chicago during that time became a national symbol of the violence in our cities.  Following the day-to-day battles of a group of Violence Interrupters, all of whom have criminal backgrounds themselves, a raw and powerful story emerges on the root causes of the violence in our cities and possible solutions.   

Great Performances at the Met      
Wagner's Dream
PBS

The stakes could not be higher as one of the theater's finest stage directors teams up with one of the world's leading opera companies to tackle opera's most monumental challenge: Richard Wagner's epic Ring cycle—a four-part, 16-hour masterwork.  The quest to produce a perfect Ring has stymied directors, including Wagner himself, who struggled to meet the immense theatrical demands of his own creation. One goal of the film was to demystify Der Ring des Nibelungen.  The operas of Wagner are a notoriously difficult subject.  From the beginning, there was an effort to make the work accessible to the widest possible audience.  A cinema vérité approach was chosen to allow the struggles of the individuals involved to be experienced in the most human terms.

 

OUTSTANDING GRAPHIC DESIGN & ART DIRECTION

In the Loop  
The Economy Of Caterpillar
Bloomberg

Graphic Artist Jonathan Reyes was tasked with giving Bloomberg TV viewers a unique look and insight into one of the world's most successful companies. INSIDE: Caterpillar gives viewers a brief history of how and when Caterpillar was born, the changes the company has gone through during the years, where it is today and where they want to go tomorrow.

CNN Opinion 
Our Mobile Society: Photographers Embrace Instagram
CNN

Naysayers contend that the explosion of cellphone images dilutes the meaning as well as the art form of photography.  CNN's Our Mobile Society makes a case for this digital form of photography as an expression of the creative experience - now, with jaw dropping graphic and visual effects to back up the argument.  The image is becoming fluid, not fixed, a communication of community and experience rather than isolated as documentation. 

Curiosity       
Battlefield Cell
Discovery Channel

Winter is approaching and once again the flu season is fast upon us.  Every day, each of our trillions of cells engages in a life and death struggle with viruses and a variety of enemy intruders.  But just how do our cells fight back and stop us from getting sick?  Or even prevent us from dying?  Discovery Channel’s CURIOSITY – BATTLEFIELD CELL searches for these answers by using cutting edge computer graphics to go into the once invisible world of the human cell.

WWII From Space   
History Channel
WORLD WAR TWO FROM SPACE harnesses the powerful and almost limitless picture creation possibilities of modern GFX, to reveal the full, global story of the greatest conflict ever fought and America’s critical involvement in its outcome. It’s a bold and innovative stylistic approach that gives this classic narrative new freedom and energy: whether its zooming in to a single man on the battlefield; or travelling back and forward in time to expose unseen causes and consequences: or pin-pointing the world’s oil fields and the battles to control them; or graphically demonstrating the economic might of America rolling out across the globe; or highlighting the alliances of power and economic that tip the balance of history. This bravura imagery, combined with the powerful testimony of US veterans and world renowned military historians, reinvigorates the telling of World war Two for a new generation.

The Woman Who Wasn't There     
Investigation Discovery
Out of the ashes of the Twin Towers emerged a group of survivors.  One survivor in particular stood out as inspirational: Tania Head, whose devastating story of narrowly escaping death from the 78th floor of the South Tower is one of true courage. But there was one problem with Tania's story that wouldn't emerge until September 2007, when a New York Times article blew the lid off of her seemingly miraculous tale: absolutely none of it was true. To visually convey the dimensions of Tania Head's imagined identity as a famous 9/11 survivor, the film makers created a surreal, cinematic landscape with a team of artists, led by photo-realist Chase Stone. Facilitated by the expertise of compositors and graphic design artists, the goal was to illustrate the emotional line between illusion and reality. This provided the audience with a deep insight into the complex humanity of the film's protagonist.

 

OUTSTANDING MUSIC & SOUND

HBO Documentary Films     
Birders: The Central Park Effect
HBO

The Central Park Effect reveals the extraordinary array of wild birds who grace Manhattan's celebrated patch of green, and the equally colorful New Yorkers who schedule their lives around the rhythms of migration. The music and sound of this lyrical documentary are intricately intertwined, combining a dreamlike soundtrack and hyper-detailed foley with the beautiful bird songs and sounds of Central Park.

HBO Documentary Films
In Tahrir Square: 18 Days of Egypt's Unfinished Revolution
HBO
They took over a city square and in 18 days brought down a regime that had ruled for 30 years. IN TAHRIR SQUARE: 18 DAYS OF EGYPT’S UNFINISHED REVOLUTION brings viewers into the streets of Cairo to experience first-hand what began as a small, peaceful demonstration and quickly grew into a revolutionary movement that would force the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. Composer Nicholas Pike and Re-Recording Mixer Ron Bochar collaborated to create an immersive environment that placed the audience at the center of the action in the square: rocks crash through windows, shots ring out and Nicholas’s music wraps around the sounds of the square to create an emotional energy that transports audiences to the center of the conflict.

Untamed Americas   
National Geographic Channel
An epic yet intimate journey through the Americas, from Alaska to Patagonia, featuring some of the most dramatic and surprising wildlife survival stories on our planet. The Americas are a land of superlatives: with the world’s longest mountains, the Andes; largest rain forest, the Amazon, and the driest desert, the Atacama. The soundscape transports the audience into the real life wild experiences portrayed on screen. The sound recording and design across the series covering such a huge variety of extreme conditions presented major challenges to sound artists, both on location and in the studio, with a huge variety of animals featured and great environmental extremes in which to record. The music enhances the emotional narrative by blending the warmth of an orchestral score with a contemporary edge, to engage a broad audience.

American Experience
Jesse Owens
PBS

He was the most famous athlete of his time, whose stunning triumph at the 1936 Olympic Games of four gold medals captivated the world, even as it infuriated the Nazis. Despite the racial slurs he endured, his grace and athleticism rallied crowds around the world. Yet when Jesse Owens returned home, he came back to a segregated America where he couldn’t even ride in the front of a bus. The music score is composed of themes representing the various elements that defined Jesse Owens: (1) Jesse’s running, which required pace and motion to capture the fluidity and beauty of the athlete, (2) the reality of the racial situation in America in the period in which Jesse lived, and (3) Hitler’s Germany and the 1936 Berlin Olympics. For Jesse’s running themes, for example, piano was chosen as the base instrument to provide a runners tempo and motion, with cello and woodwinds shaping the melodic and emotional support. The enormous quantity of silent archival material in Jesse Owens required a full sound design: just about every scene has extensive backgrounds and foreground sound effects added, bringing to life spectacular historical footage. 

Nature          
An Original DUCKumentary
PBS

“An Original DUCKumentary” takes viewers past the familiar first impression of these much loved creatures to uncover the truly remarkable abilities they possess.  Ducks are beautiful, but they are more than that. Ducks are complex animals that survive in a host of environments, from tropical climes to the most extreme Arctic conditions.  Composing the music for “An Original DUCKumentary” was challenging on many levels.  One obstacle was to avoid the obvious caricature of ducks as awkward and comedic.  The composers consciously tried to create nuanced and layered music to help compliment the filmmakers’ desire to illuminate the duck’s true identity. The sound build was complex, with many elements recorded in the field and others that had to be created with clever foley. Given the remarkably varied locations and environments featured in the film, the brief was to create just the right soundscape to make each one come alive. 

 

OUTSTANDING LIGHTING DIRECTION & SCENIC DESIGN

CBS This Morning     
CBS This Morning: Studio 57
CBS

On January 9th, 2012, CBS launched “CBS This Morning,” a new program billed as “a more thoughtful, substantive and insightful” alternative to morning television. With this launch, CBS sought to redefine a category, offering viewers a decidedly news-focused program in line with the network’s long-standing commitment to original programming and journalistic integrity.  They designed a broadcast set befitting the network’s unique approach to morning television.

Mankind: The Story of All of Us     
Plague
History Channel

It takes 10 billion years for the ideal planet to form and 3 billion more for the right conditions to emerge before it finally happens: mankind begins.  From there unfolds a fast-paced story told here through key turning points—stepping stones in our journey from hunter-gatherer to global citizen.  It’s a tale of connections—why some ideas take hold and spread around the globe, and how the lives of people in one part of the world are shaped by events in another. MANKIND set out to achieve what no other series had done before it:  to tell the entire history of the human race, from the Big Bang to the present day. All told in a way that is highly ambitious in the scale of its cinematic vision – CGI-enhanced dramatic reconstructions of the most critical events in human history.

NBC News: Decision 2012   
Election Night from Democracy Plaza
NBC

NBC, The Lighting Design Group and Jack Morton Worldwide’s collaboration on “NBC News: Decision 2012 - NBC Election Night from Democracy Plaza” captured the energy, grand scale, as well as the drama of the 2012 Presidential Election, which is without a doubt one of the premier theatrical events in the country. The lighting and scenic design saw the main plaza at Rockefeller Center transformed into Democracy Plaza and was used as the main back drop and focal point for NBC Universal's on-air talent. Patriotism was the guiding framework for the evening.

Jefferson's Secret Bible       
Smithsonian Channel
Relatively few people know that along with authoring the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson also compiled his own text, drawn carefully from passages extracted out of the New Testament, that he titled "The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth." The book, which focused on the ethical teachings of Jesus, was a private undertaking for Jefferson and never made public in his lifetime. Now, experts at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History are meticulously conserving this fragile volume, page by brittle page. Along the way, they discover subtle hidden clues to Jefferson himself. This film is equal parts high tech forensic paper conservation and historical look back into the mind of a president.  The contrasting story lines are highlighted by creating a distinctive look for both the re-creations and the scenes set in the conservation laboratory.  In the laboratory, the use of precision instruments and the rigors of the scientific method are complemented with a crisp, cool lighting design to transform the whitewashed, flat lighting environment of the laboratory into a high-contrast, hi-tech, dramatic world. The re-creations used lighting to achieve the opposite effect.  Lighting schemes were designed to bathe the early 19th century subjects in a highly naturalistic feel, while maintaining a high-contrast, edgy style. 

Titanic's Final Mystery                  
Smithsonian Channel
A century ago, the "unsinkable" Titanic plunged to the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean. With each passing year, the myth surrounding the ship has grown, as have arguments over why and how she met her demise. However, a recent study blows all other theories out of the water. Follow Titanic detective Tim Maltin as he shares the results of his 20-year investigation. Combining thousands of hours of eyewitness testimony with modern scientific investigation, he reveals that the real culprits may have been forces beyond human control. The design concept of Titanic started from the certainty that it would not ever feature a realistic wide shot of the ship. Every image had to be constructed from the smallest possible elements assembled in the camera frame and minimally post produced. Within these tight constraints, with the help of a green screen and a lot of research, the design team faithfully re-created many different parts of the ship. Including: 1st Class lounge complete with promenade deck, a 2nd Class cabin, the Crow’s Nest, The Bridge, Morse Code room, Lifeboats, the swimming pool and the cold night ocean.

 

OUTSTANDING PROMOTIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT - INSTITUTIONAL

CBS News     
What We Do
CBS

The What We Do image spot sought to drive home the message that if you blink you might miss something, and CBS News never blinks.  This is a glimpse inside how CBS News sheds light on each and every story.  Proving great original reporting comes from going where the story is each and every day.

CNBC Network Image Spot: "Winning"     
CNBC
Vince Lombardi - his name is synonymous with winning. So is the American Spirit. This spot takes the words of this grid iron legend and applies them to America's entrepreneurs, trailblazers and mavericks. Not to mention the daily rigors of the people who cover them.

FRONTLINE  
FRONTLINE Fall Preview: How Come?
PBS

FRONTLINE focuses it lens on some of the hardest hitting and most sorrowful stories of our times.  The challenge is to brand the series promotionally in a way that pays respect to the content as well as sparking viewers’ attention.  To this end, in promoting a new season, FRONTLINE always try to capture the mood of the country. This year they chose to do so with a very personal tone. 

POV   
25th Anniversary Promotional Reel
PBS

In 1988, Marc Weiss envisioned a documentary film series that would challenge the notion of television as a one-way medium, one that could inform and engage audiences with unique content and diverse perspectives to maximize television's potential.  POV, launched on PBS in 1988, celebrated its 25th anniversary on-air, online and on the ground in communities across the United States in 2012. For part of POV’s 25th Anniversary campaign, an intimate and unforgettable two-minute promotional reel was created, bringing together scenes from 25 years of POV films.

 

OUTSTANDING PROMOTIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT – EPISODIC

ABC NEWS    
ABC News Political Conventions "Slide Puzzle"
ABC

A modern twist on a timeless game…A  Slide puzzle.  ABC News connected all the pieces of the 2012 campaign together into a political puzzle.  The goal was to help viewers see the whole picture as the Conventions approached

Wicked Tuna 
No Fear and Face Off
National Geographic Channel

Wicked Tuna is all about the hard-working men and women who fish for giant Bluefin Tuna off the coast of Gloucester, Mass.  They work tirelessly to catch one of the toughest fish in the ocean, with the hope of landing a fish worth up to 10 to 15 thousand dollars each. The goal of the season two promos was to step up the visual power and punch, as well as the action and drama – and go out on the water with the captains. The promos begin on the docks and then follow the captains as they ‘face off’ and then head out to sea. The goal of increasing the action and drama was met with intense, epic music, a driving edit, and beautiful imagery of fishing that felt like a hyper-realized version of the show itself.

Through the Wormhole      
Science Channel
On Through The Wormhole with Morgan Freeman, Science Channel aims to further the potential for intelligent discourse on television by asking the “big questions” with a philosopher’s zeal – encouraging viewers to think, feel, and always question everything. The questions featured in Season 3 of Through The Wormhole are among the most profound and provocative topics facing humanity today. The promotion aims to stay true to the mission of the program: to be different, to be smart and to be challenging, all while capturing our viewers' attentions and stimulating their minds.

 

OUTSTANDING REGIONAL NEWS STORY - SPOT NEWS

WBZ-TV News (Boston, MA)
Newtown Tragedy
WBZ-TV

This entry in the breaking news category highlights WBZ-TV's coverage of the murders at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT.  This national story had particular resonance here in New England.  It also has come to impact the debate over gun control, something that is important in Massachusetts.

NBC 5 NEWS AT 10 (Chicago, IL)  
NATO Protest
WMAQ-TV

Last May, Chicago played host to thousands of visitors from around the world, with some coming to take part in a global political event, some coming to watch that event unfold, and some coming for the sole purpose of trying to disrupt it as much as possible.  That event was the 2012 NATO Summit. It featured not only the delegations from the NATO member nations, but some 2000 journalists accredited to cover the proceedings, and thousands of demonstrators who descended on the city, most associated with the so-called “Occupy” movement.

WNBC Breaking News Coverage (New York, NY) 
Shooting Near the Empire State Building
WNBC-TV
When news broke of a shooting near the Empire State Building, News 4 raced to go live with continuous coverage. News 4 was the first to ID the suspect through sources, the first to get to his house and speak to neighbors, the first to get to a victim's home and speak to loved ones, and the first to report on a motive.

 

OUTSTANDING REGIONAL NEWS STORY - INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING

KING 5 News (Seattle, WA) 
Their Crime, Your Dime
KING 5 TV
In June 2011, Washington State’s governor signed her name to Senate Bill 5921.  After a legislative session that saw lawmakers make dramatic cuts to state spending, the newly enacted law did the opposite – delivering $5 million to fund a revamped fraud fighting program.  Tight-fisted lawmakers agreed that it was money well spent following KING 5’s investigative series exposing unchecked fraud in state and federal welfare programs.  As these programs ballooned during the economic crash, many worthy recipients came forward.  So, too, did criminals who found they could cheat Washington’s lax fraud prevention programs out of millions of dollars.  “Their Crime, Your Dime” exposed the swindlers and the government’s incompetence.

ABC15 News (Phoenix, AZ)  
Sheriff's School of Abuse
KNXV-TV

In January 2012, when Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu announced he was running for congress, he was considered a “rising star” in the Republican party.  Despite his growing popularity, the electorate had very little factual information about Paul Babeu’s character, background and accomplishments.  The investigation began by examining Paul Babeu's tenure as headmaster and executive director of the DeSisto School, a therapeutic boarding academy in Massachusetts.  The ABC15 Investigators traveled to Massachusetts, exposing the dark past of the DeSisto School, an institution so rife with physical and sexual abuse under Babeu’s leadership that state investigators eventually ordered the unlicensed school to be closed permanently.

WABC TV News (New York, NY)    
Mace in Your Face?
WABC-TV

The tip seemed straightforward: a phony doctor on Long Island who wasn't really a doctor.  Proving that fact and finding patients required intense research and classic undercover work.  He was employed as a physician's assistant at a large clinic but WABC uncovered evidence he was acting as an M.D. There was an added twist: the phony doctor was also using the name of a real doctor: his business partner, who had a separate practice.  We did additional undercover research to try to figure out if the two were acting in concert.

WTTG-TV News (Washington, DC) 
UDC
WTTG-TV

This 16-part investigative series exposed out-of-control spending by the president of the University of District of Columbia, the only publicly-funded university in the nation’s capital.  WTTG showed how President Allen Sessoms used taxpayer dollars on first-class travel, a luxury automobile and home renovations, all when he was doubling student tuition. 

WXYZ-TV Investigative Reports (Detroit, MI)      
Corruption in the County
WXYZ-TV
This is an investigation that has exposed a culture of corruption at the highest levels of Michigan’s largest county. WXYZ-TV’s reporting prompted an FBI investigation which has led to criminal charges, including indictments, guilty pleas, and so far one conviction at trial. Our investigative series has also resulted in firings, resignations, and a recall effort against the Wayne County Executive.